Video Roundup – Four Inspiring Stories Of People Who Have Overcome Neurogenic Bladders

4 Inspiring Stories of People Who Have Overcome Neurogenic Bladder

Becoming paralyzed or learning that you have MS or another neurological condition is anyone’s worst nightmare. The everyday freedoms that most of us take for granted suddenly become the main focus of life and things that were easy before become monumentally more difficult. We’ve rounded up stories from 4 inspiring people who have overcome tremendous obstacles and are determined to live life on their own terms. Watch their amazing stories in the links below.

Botox Injections For Neurogenic Bladder

Watch this self-taped video from Paralyzed Living about how he uses Botox injections to treat his neurogenic bladder.

Daniela’s Story

Watch Daniela’s inspiring story of how a freak accident left her a quadriplegic, unable to use her legs, and limited use of her arms and hands. Daniela struggled with bladder management, and finally took matters into her own hands by conducting extensive research into her options and finding a solution that has helped her regain her independence.

Audrey’s story

Audrey became paralyzed after an accident and suffered from bowel issues, but found the freedom to do what she wants from using Peristeen, a product for bowel management.

Amy’s Story

MS can wreak havoc on your bladder, resulting in urgent and frequent trips to the restroom, and in some cases, leakage. Watch this story from Amy, on how she used Botox to help her regain control.

Amy’s Video Diary – Before:  

Amy’s Video Diary – After:

Do you have your own story you’d like to share? Contact us!

Watch NAFC's Videos For Tips On Self-Catheterization

Being told that you have to use a catheter can be scary, but many people use a catheter to empty their bladders on both a temporary and a long-term basis. And while you might recoil from the idea at first, once you get the hang of using one and see the benefits it can bring, it you may wonder how you were ever able to get by without it.

With a little practice, using a catheter can become second nature to you.

Here are our best tips for using a urinary catheter.

  • Don’t be afraid to ask your doctor lots of questions. Catheters should be prescribed by your doctor and proper instruction should be given to you by your healthcare provider. If you are unsure of the process, speak up.
  • Be sure to keep the catheter and catheter site clean to avoid infections (UTIs are common with those using a catheter). Wash at least twice per day.
  • Use lubrication when inserting the catheter to reduce pain, discomfort, and friction – all of which may also help reduce infection.
  • Always wash your hands thoroughly prior to and after emptying the urine bag.
  • Be careful of tugging on the tubing, twisting, it, or stepping on the tubing when you are walking. It may be helpful for you to clip the tubing to your clothing to avoid this.
  • Always keep the urine bag below your bladder (below your waste) to prevent urine from flowing back into your bladder and causing an infection.
  • Drink plenty of fluid to help keep your urine flowing well.
  • Stock up on spare catheter equipment for emergencies.
  • Call your doctor if you experience any of the following
    • Trouble inserting or cleaning your catheter
    • Urine leakage between catheterizations
    • You notice any type of smell
    • Blood in the urine
    • Skin rash
    • Pain or burning in the urethra, bladder, or lower back
    • Swelling, draining, or redness in your urethra.
    • Any sign of a urinary tract infection, such as a burning sensation, a need to urinate often, a fever, or chills.

Learning how to use a catheter doesn’t have to be daunting.

Watch NAFC’s videos on how to self-catheterize for both men and women here.

Self-Catheterization for Women:

Self Catheterization for Men:

What Is Neurogenic Bladder?

What Is Neurogenic Bladder?

Having a neurological condition presents many challenges, but one that few people likely think about until they are dealing with it is how the condition may affect your ability to use the restroom. Like many organs, the bladder is controlled by nerves that connect to your brain and spinal cord. When these functions are challenged due to a neurological condition, it can cause a person to have a neurogenic bladder.

What is Neurogenic Bladder?

Neurogenic bladder happens when there is a lack of bladder control due to a brain, spinal cord or nerve problem. Typically, the bladder has two functions – storing urine, and removing it from the body. These functions are controlled by communication in the spinal cord and brain. When a person’s nerves, brain or spinal cord become injured, the way they communicate with the bladder can become compromised.

There are two types of neurogenic bladder: the bladder can become overactive (spastic or hyper-reflexive), or under-active (flaccid or hypotonic).

With an overactive bladder, patients experience strong and frequent urges to use the bathroom, and sometimes have trouble making it in time, resulting in urinary incontinence.

In an under-active bladder, the sphincter muscles may not work correctly and may stay tight when you are trying to empty your bladder, resulting in urinary retention (producing only a small amount of urine) or obstructive bladder (when you are unable to empty your bladder at all). In either case, treatment is available.

What Causes Neurogenic Bladder?

Neurogenic bladder can be caused by a number of conditions. Some children are born with neurogenic bladder. Children born with spina bifida (when the fetus’ spine does not completely develop during the first month of pregnancy), sacral agenesis (when lower parts of the spine are missing), or cerebral palsy (a disorder that weakens a person’s ability to control body movement and posture) all may suffer from neurogenic bladder due to their conditions. Other medical conditions that may cause neurogenic bladder are Parkinson’s disease, Multiple Sclerosis (MS), spinal cord injury, stroke, or central nervous system tumors.

What Are The Treatment Options For Neurogenic Bladder?

Luckily, there are many treatment options for neurogenic bladder. Treatments vary depending on whether you have overactive bladder or urinary retention. To learn about treatments for these conditions, click through the links below.

Treatments for Overactive Bladder

Treatments for Urinary Retention

A neurogenic bladder doesn’t have to limit your life. Don’t be afraid to explore your options and find a treatment that works for you.

Do you have a neurogenic bladder? Tell us about your experience in the comments below – we’d love to hear about treatment options that have worked for you!