Will Drinking Green Tea Help Me Lose Weight?

Will Drinking Green Tea Help Me Lose Weight?

We all know that being overweight can put us at a greater risk for many health problems. But did you know that carrying around too much weight could contribute to incontinence? Extra weight can put additional stress on the bladder and pelvic floor muscles, causing you to need to run to the bathroom more than normal, or worse, experience bladder leaks.

While maintaining a proper diet and following a regular exercise regime are the best methods for losing weight, adding small changes to your weight-loss strategy may help too. Drinking green tea may help you on your weight loss journey, but it’s far from the silver bullet many people want it to be. 

How does green tea helps you to lose weight and reduce bloating?

Green tea has been used for centuries for it’s high dose of antioxidants and health benefits and has long been thought to help with weight loss. Green tea contains caffeine and also something called catechins, which are very potent antioxidants that are also sound in certain fruits, dark chocolate and red wine. Among other things, catechins, combined with caffeine, are thought to help promote the breakdown of fat, increase the fat oxidation during moderate-intensity exercise, and raise your metabolic rate causing you to burn more calories. 

Most of the studies that have been done have used green tea extract, and not the actual tea, and the results seen have been modest. However, combined with a good diet and exercise, green tea may be a good addition to your weight loss plan, especially if you’re subbing in a cup in exchange for a high calorie soda. 

As for bloating, many eastern cultures have used green tea for years because it’s been thought to help aid in digestion and reduce abdominal boating.

Should I just be taking green tea capsules or supplements? Are they safe?

While most studies that haves examined the effects of green tea have used green tea extract, experts say to use caution with these supplements since they are much more concentrated than just drinking tea. Taking too much green tea extract has been shown to lead to liver damage. Consult your doctor before

Green tea capsules are made up of more concentrated doses of catechins, and if over-consumed, could lead to liver damage. Be very cautious of consuming green tea supplements and always talk to your doctor before starting any new regimen.

What are the other benefits of drinking green tea? 

While the effects of drinking green tea for weight loss are modest, the other health benefits associated with the beverage are many. Catechins, the same antioxidant associated with aiding weight loss, also is thought to help with things like lowering the risk of infections, controlling your blood pressure, regulating glucose levels, protecting the brain, and even decreasing the risk of heart disease or specific cancers. Catechins in green tea have also been shown to improve dental health by stopping the growth of harmful bacteria in the mouth that cause cavities.  

How should I drink green tea?

There is no hard and fast rule on how much green tea you should be drinking for weight loss or other health benefits, but most studies that have looked at the effects of green tea have looked at people who drink at least 3 cups, and even up to 5 cups of green tea per day.

Talk with your doctor, as some teas can interact with other supplements or medications. 

It’s important to remember that the weight loss benefits of green tea are a hotly debated topic. There are many studies that have shown some weigh loss effects, but others that have shown no effects at all. However, adding green tea to your diet may, at the very least, provide you with some good health benefits, and certainly can’t hurt your weight loss efforts (as long as you don’t load it up with extras like honey or cream!).  Every little bit helps!

As always, use caution when adding something new to your diet or supplement intake. It’s always a good idea to consult your doctor, as some teas may interact with other supplements or medications.