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Encourage others to start talking and gain control of their bladder health!  We've made it simple for you to share National Bladder Health Week news, resources, tips and tools with your friends, family and healthcare providers.  We have a variety of  simple activities you can choose from to promote awareness of bladder health.  They are cut and paste one of the sample newsletter or emails below.

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When Should You Start Potty Training Your Toddler?

Sarah Jenkins

Potty Training - When To Start

Potty Training your little one is a big step, and one that can happen at different times for different kids.  There is no one magic timeline since each child is unique. Some toddlers are ready to begin the process as early as 18 months, although a very small percentage of children under 24 months are fully potty trained. Two and a half, or even three years old, is a typical age for kids to start.

Look for the following signs to see if your child is ready to start potty training.

  1. They show interest in the bathroom. Is your child telling you when they are wet? Do they want to watch you go to the bathroom? Are they asking to wear underwear or big-kids pants? These are all signs that they are may be ready to start potty training.
  2. Their patterns become more regular. They have bowel movements at about the same time each day, no bowel movements at night, and can go for at least a couple of hours at a time without having a wet diaper, which means their bladder muscles are able to hold urine.
  3. They are emotionally ready. Kids who have no interest in using the potty, don’t want to wear underwear, and generally don’t mind being in a wet diaper are probably not yet ready to start the process. 
  4. They are physically ready. It takes some coordination to use the toilet. Kids must be able to walk, sit down, remove clothing, climb up to the toilet, and tell their parent or caregiver that they need to use the potty.

It’s important to reiterate that every child is different and to follow your child’s lead. Girls are often potty trained faster than boys. And if you have multiple children, younger siblings may benefit from seeing their older siblings go through the process, making it go more quickly for them. But watch for the signs listed above - starting to potty train before your child is ready will cause frustrations for you both, and will often take longer than if you had waited for them to show more interest.  Also know that it’s common for a child to master using the potty during the day, but still have some trouble staying dry at night. Nightime training often takes a bit longer– sometimes even a few years after daytime dryness has been established.

Think your little one is ready to start easing their way out of diapers? Here are our best tips for successful potty training.