Treating Overactive Bladder With Behavioral Modifications

 Treating Overactive Bladder With Behavioral Modifications

Overactive bladder can be very disruptive to a person’s life. Constantly rushing to the bathroom, feeling like you need to go every time you start to do the dishes, and the occasional leakage that comes with OAB can cause frustration and embarrassment.  

But did you know there are many simple behavioral changes you can make that can help you manage OAB, some of which may not even require a trip to the doctor? Read before for some new ideas to help you manage your OAB and prevent leaks. 

Diet

You may not be able to function without your morning cup of coffee, or that sugary mid afternoon snack, but did you know that certain types of food, such as caffeine and sugar can actually irritate your bladder and trigger OAB symptoms?  While not every known bladder trigger may be a trigger for you specifically (everyone’s different after all!), it’s worth it to start noting what you’re eating and drinking when you start experiencing symptoms.  Try keeping a bladder diary to track your food and drink intake, and see how it may be coinciding with your OAB.  And download our list of bladder irritants to hang on your fridge as a reminder of foods to watch out for.   

Exercise

Maintaining a healthy weight helps not only your waisteline – it’s good for your bladder too!  Being overweight can contribute to leaks so get out there and get moving. It doesn’t have to be strenuous – walking for 30 minutes a day can do wonder for your physical and mental well-being.  And a light weight routine can help you build muscle mass that will keep you strong and healthy. 

And don’t forget about your pelvic floor!  Maintaining a healthy pelvic floor is imperative to your bladder health.  If you struggle with OAB, and especially if that includes any amount of leakage, we recommend that you see a physical therapist to get an evaluation of your pelvic floor. Pelvic floors that are too weak, or too tight, can lead to urine leakage and its important to know how to both strengthen and relax your pelvic floor for optimal pelvic floor health. If you need help finding a physical therapist specializing in pelvic floor health, use our specialist finder tool to find one in your area.

Bladder Retraining

Did you know you can actually retrain your bladder to hold urine for longer increments of time?  With a little practice, retraining your bladder can let you go for longer stints without needing to empty it.  Try our step by step guide here.

If you struggle with Overactive Bladder, watch the second video in our Overactive Bladder video series: Managing OAB With Behavioral Modifications.