The Growing Array Of Options For Managing Fecal Incontinence

Treatment Options For Fecal Incontinence

It wasn’t long ago that those suffering with fecal incontinence had just a handful of options. They could try behavioral modifications (still largely used today), absorbent products to help manage the condition, bowel retraining, medications, or surgery. But in the last several years, companies have been coming out with more and more innovative products to manage ABL. 

We’ve rounded up some of the newest products and therapies to help you control ABL.

Fenix® Implant:

The Fenix® Implant, is a small, flexible band of connected metal beads with magnetic cores that is placed around the anal canal to treat accidental bowel leakage (ABL). The beads will separate temporarily to allow the controlled passage of stool. The magnetic force between the beads then brings the implant back to the closed position to prevent unexpected opening of the anal canal that may lead to ABL.

Renew® Insert:

The Renew® Insert is a new product designed to comfortably fit with your body to form a seal with the rectum, which blocks the anal passage and prevents leaks from occurring.  

Eclipse™:

Eclipse™, which is fitted first by a physician, is an inflatable balloon device that is inserted into the vagina. When inflated, the balloon puts pressure through the vaginal wall onto the rectal area, thereby reducing the number of FI episodes.

SECCA:

The SECCA procedure is an outpatient procedure that can be performed in your doctor’s office. It is best used when other more conservative therapies have failed. The non-surgical procedure works by delivering radiofrequency energy to the tissues of the anal canal, causing the tissues to shrink and tighten.  SECCA takes about 45 minutes to perform and patients are able to return home 1-2 hours after the procedure. Most patients begin to see an improvement in 4 to 6 weeks.

InterStim™ System: 

Sacral Neuromodulation, delivered through the InterStim™ System, works by targeting the communication problem between the brain and the sacral nerves, which control the muscles related to bowel function.  This Bowel Control Therapy targets the symptoms of bowel incontinence by modulating the sacral nerves with mild electrical pulses. Sacral Neuromodulation typically only takes about 20 minutes in a doctor’s office.

Talk with your doctor to see if one of these products may work for you.  If you need help finding a physician, check out the NAFC Specialist Locator.

Ask The Expert: What Should Be The First Line Of Defense In The Treatment For Fecal Incontinence

first line of defense in the treatment Of Fecal Incontinence

Each month, we ask our expert panel to answer one of our reader's questions. To learn more about the NAFC Expert Panel, and how to submit your own question, see below.

Question:  What should be the first line of defense in the treatment for Fecal Incontinence?

Answer:  My advice would always be to first talk with your doctor.  This may be an uncomfortable conversation to have, but it’s one worth having, since your doctor is best equipped to diagnose and treat the condition.  However, if you’re just not ready to take that step yet, there are a few things you can do.

How To Treat Fecal Incontinence

1. Keep a bowel diary. 

It may seem strange to track your bowel movements, but by tracking the time of your movements, what you were doing at the time, and what you eat during the day, you may be able to uncover some clues as to what is causing you to have frequent movements or accidents. Download a free bowel diary here.

2. Change up your diet. 

Certain foods can be irritating to your bowel and by keeping a healthy diet you may be able to lessen some of your symptoms.  Try eating foods rich in fiber, which can help create bulkier stools and make them easier to control. Drink plenty of water to avoid constipation (which, contrary to what you might think, can also cause ABL since loose stools can push their way past hardened ones causing leakage.)

3. Develop a routine. 

Take a look at your bowel diary and see if you notice a pattern to your bowel movements or accidents.  Try developing a voiding schedule to circumvent these episodes.

4. Exercise. 

Getting in a good workout is always a good idea, but it can be especially helpful in keeping constipation under control. Exercising helps to move food through the large intestine more quickly, which can prevent it from becoming hard and dry (and harder to pass.)  And keeping the pelvic floor in shape with regular exercise and kegel contractions can help control and reduce fecal incontinence.

If you don’t experience any improvement in your condition after making the above adjustments, it may be time to bite the bullet and speak with a doctor. Rest assured you won’t be the first one to share this type of problem with them and they will be able to point you in the direction of something that will work best for you.

Are you an expert in incontinence care? Would you like to join the NAFC expert panel? Contact us!

The Best Products For Treating Accidental Bowel Leakage

The Best Products For Treating Accidental Bowel Leakage

If you suffer from fecal incontinence, you know that you will do anything to prevent leaks from happening.  Fortunately, there are many products on the market that can do just that.  We’ve rounded up some of the most popular products for accidental bowel leakage to share with you here.   

The Best Products For Accidental Bowel Leakage

Supplements.

Fiber supplements may be a good first step to try if you are experiencing loose stools, as they bulk up the consistency of your stool and make it less liquid.  Good sources of fiber are found in lots of foods such as split peas, many types of beans, and berries. Fiber supplements can also help, and can be found in many health food stores.  Look for products that contain psyllium or methylcellulose.

Anti-diarrhea Medication.

Products like Immodium or Pepto-Bismol can really help people who deal with the occasional loose stools.  However, it’s important to not use products like these for more than a couple of days

Anti-Constipation Medication.

While most cases of constipation can be fixed by incorporating a healthier diet and maintaining proper fluid intake (8 cups of water a day is the norm), sometimes you may need a little help to get things moving.  Most of the medications available, such as Amitiza® and Miralax® work by drawing extra water to the stool to make it softer and easier to pass. As with anti-diarrhea medication, these products usually should not be used for extended periods of time.

ABL Specific Absorbent Products.

Absorbents for urinary incontinence get a lot of attention, but did you know that there are specific products just for fecal incontinence? Butterfly body liners are designed for light leakage and are unique in that they fit discreetly in between the buttocks.  Other super absorbent products from common names like Tena, Poise and Reassure also work well for bowel leakage.

Skin protection.

If you suffer from any type of incontinence, it is important to take care of your skin.  Barrier creams and ointments to protect and treat the skin from rashes or infection can be found online and in local drugstores.

Collection Symptoms.

For those with heavier leakage, there are multiple options ranging from bags adhered directly to the skin to catheters and tubes attached to a collection bag.

Vaginal Inserts.

Eclipse™, which is fitted first by a physician, is an inflatable balloon device that is inserted into the vagina. When inflated, the balloon puts pressure through the vaginal wall onto the rectal area, thereby reducing the number of FI episodes.

Rectal Inserts.

The Renew® Insert is a new product designed to comfortably fit with your body to form a seal with the rectum, which blocks the anal passage and prevents leaks from occurring.  

Another device on the market, the Fenix® Implant, is a small, flexible band of connected metal beads with magnetic cores that is placed around the anal canal to treat accidental bowel leakage (ABL). The beads will separate temporarily to allow the controlled passage of stool. The magnetic force between the beads then brings the implant back to the closed position to prevent unexpected opening of the anal canal that may lead to ABL.

Have you tried any other products not listed above? Tell us about them in the comments!