Traveling With Incontinence

traveling with incontinence

Traveling can be challenging for people of all ages. Finding where you need to go, packing, arriving on time, following directions, and navigating any issues along the way can be stressful and difficult. Traveling with incontinence adds an extra layer of complexity. From packing appropriately, products and extra clothes, to additional stops and locating bathrooms, traveling with incontinence takes added planning, coordination, and consideration of each part of the trip. However, with some useful tips and the right products, adults can continue to explore the world and visit people they loved while managing incontinence!

Traveling takes you out of your typical routine and your comfort zone. For adults with incontinence, finding a routine that balances managing their incontinence condition and living an ordinary life is so important.  When you are traveling and have a new ordinary, you should develop a plan to take control of your experience.

Therefore, we have compiled 6 tips for traveling with incontinence to help you find the travel routine that works for your condition and lifestyle.

6 Tips for Traveling with Incontinence

Move up in Absorbency

When taking a trip in the car or on a plane, you typically are wearing the same product for a longer time period than in your normal, at home routine. A tip for longer trips is to move up in absorbency or find a product with more absorbency. It is common for people with incontinence to have a product for daytime wear and a different product for overnight use, so it’s normal to have a product for regular wear and a product for traveling. In fact, your typical overnight product may be your travel product. Regardless, it is helpful to find a product that provides more protection than your normal, everyday product. You can even consider adding a booster pad to your regular product for a few more hours of protection. Plus, with a booster pad you can quickly change the booster pad without having to change the host garment (diaper or brief), a great tip for quick on the go changes. Using a product with extra absorbency ensures that if you do have an accident or can’t locate a bathroom, you’ll be protected.

Time your Bathroom Trips

When traveling, it is always a good idea to locate bathrooms and plan a set amount of time between trips to the bathroom. This may depend on your condition and fluid intake, but generally planning to go to the bathroom every 2-3 hours is recommended. Timing your voids will help reduce the likelihood of soiling your incontinence product while allowing you to continue drinking an adequate amount of water. On that note, monitor your fluid intake and be sure to continue to drink water. On a long car trip, it may sound tough to stop every 2 hours to go to the bathroom, but you’d rather stop every few hours for 10 minutes than have an accident and spend more time trying to clean everything up!

Absorbent products

Supplies, Supplies, Supplies

Supplies refers to absorbent products, extra clothes, and any other supplies you use (wipes. gloves, creams, etc.). Be sure to bring more than enough supplies so that you feel confident in all possible situations. Bring an extra bag of just additional supplies if you must, it will make you feel more protected just knowing you have it.

Additionally, consider sending additional absorbent products or other supplies to your destination ahead of time. If you’ll be gone for a few weeks or months, it may be easier to ship yourself supplies or place an order online and have the product delivered to your travel location. This will help cut down on the bags you have to carry and transport.

Give Yourself Extra Time

Often during trips and travel people are in a rush and are running late. So, it is helpful to give yourself plenty of time to arrive early to the airport or to the hotel or wherever your travel takes you. This will give you time to locate bathrooms, use the bathroom, find your gate or destination, and extra time for anything else that comes along. How much extra time you need is up to you and your routine but erring on the side of too much extra time is advisable.

Locate Nearby Bathrooms

It’s also important to locate the nearest bathrooms or rest stops along your trip so when you need to go you can quickly stop. If you start to feel the urge to use the bathroom, don’t try to hold it longer than necessary. Get off at the next exit or find the next bathroom in the airport and go. Trying to hold it makes you more likely to have an accident. You can also use our list of apps to help you locate a bathroom!

airplane aisle

Aisle Seats Near the Bathroom or Extra Stops

If you are traveling on a plane, it is helpful to reserve an aisle seat close to the bathroom in case you need to go during the flight. This will make it easier for you to get up without bothering any one and be close to the bathroom in case you get a sudden urge.

If you are taking a car trip, practicing timed voids and stopping every 2-3 hours helps reduce the chance of accidents. It’s much easier to stop for 15-30 minutes to use the bathroom and stretch your legs every few hours than it is to drive for 5 hours but have to change your product, clothes, and potentially clean up a mess in the car. If you’re wearing a maximum absorbency product and feel comfortable riding for 4-5 hours without stopping, you can certainly do that! But to ensure a smooth trip without a mess or changes, regular stops are a good solution.

Never Stop Exploring

Traveling with incontinence can add complexity at any age and any level of incontinence. Long trips take extra planning, considerations, time, and often money. But with the right planning and organization, and using the tips above, you can continue to travel and enjoy time in the places you love. Hopefully you can use these tips and learn your own tricks and tips that work for you as you embark on your travel adventures! Never stop exploring!

Contributed by Tranquility® Incontinence Products – Premium Protection for When Performance Matters Most

Ask The Expert: How Do I Avoid Leaks When Visiting Loved Ones?

How Do I Avoid Leaks When Visiting Loved Ones?

Each month, we ask our expert panel to answer one of our reader's questions. To learn more about the NAFC Expert Panel, and how to submit your own question, see below.

Question: I suffer from incontinence and will be visiting my daughter for 3 weeks this holiday season. I’m terrified I’ll have an accident at her house. Do you have any precautions I can take to avoid leaks and the accompanying embarrassment?

Answer: This is a common concern and is a great topic to discuss around the holidays. There are many things you can do to avoid leaks, as well as a few things you can have at the ready in case a leak does happen at your loved one’s home.  

As always, preparation is key, and will help give you some peace of mind knowing that you have the proper products in place to prevent leaks. Be sure to bring plenty of supplies with you: absorbent products for day and night, extra changes of clothes (black is a great color choice since it goes with everything and hides leaks well), and extra medication, if you’re on it. After all, when traveling during the winter season, anything is possible and delayed or canceled flights can leave you unprepared – pack extras so that you have enough to last you for a few extra days just in case. If you have trouble at night, bring your own waterproof pad (or two) to protect the bedding. Don’t forget about any other supplies you may need – skin protectants or cleansers, detergents for doing a load of laundry, disposable plastic bags to hold used or wet products, and an odor neutralizing spray to hide any unwanted odors.

An extra bag can help you transport and hide your supplies, as well as serve as a place to store used products or clothes that you can dispose of when convenient for you.  And if you’re a woman, upgrade your purse to a tote bag that can hold extra supplies you may need when you’re out and about.

Finally, the holidays can be a time of indulgence, so watch what you’re eating and drinking. Skip the coffee and alcohol, limit spicy foods and sweets, and avoid any foods that you know irritate your bladder. 

Are you an expert in incontinence care? Would you like to join the NAFC expert panel? Have a question you'd like answered? Contact us!

Tips For Managing Bladder Leaks When Traveling

Managing Bladder Leaks When Traveling

For the more than 25 million Americans with bladder control loss, leaving their comfort zone can be a daunting thought. It doesn’t have to be this way. With preparation and the right know-how, the anxious and uncomfortable feelings can be eliminated.

Imagine forgoing a golfing trip with your buddies or missing your favorite niece’s graduation because you will be in a situation where there may not be restrooms in sight. This is what many people with urinary incontinence and overactive bladder do. There are steps to take before your trip so that you are prepared for these situations.

First you should know how the medications you are taking affect your bladder function and body by asking your doctor about medications to help control urinary incontinence. Be aware that you will need to begin to take these medications weeks before your trip. Many people think of these medications as event management—take a pill when going out. But these medications need to be in the system for a couple of weeks for them to take effect. It is also helpful to get acclimated to the effects of a new medication, such as dry mouth or constipation, so that you can find ways to manage these side effects before going out of town.

Map out public restrooms in the city you are traveling to. There are online tools, mobile phone applications, and books devoted to this. 

Pack management tools. Absorbent products can be helpful in situations when loss of urine and bowel control is unpredictable. Pads, briefs, and absorbent underwear should be chosen for absorbency, comfort and fit. Visit the absorbent product section of NAFC’s website for more information.

Think about the travel it takes to arrive at your destination. While traveling you want to make it easy as possible to get to a restroom. If you’re traveling by airplane, get an aisle seat. And be sure to go to the bathroom before the drink cart heads down the aisle. You can also use online tools, such as Google Maps, to find rest stops along your driving routes, if you are traveling by car. Not every car on a passenger train has a restroom; perhaps you need to consider upgrading to business class or ask the reservation clerk for a seat closest to the toilet. And public toilets are often lacking supplies. Always have hand sanitizer, wipes, and pocket tissue handy.

While on vacation pay attention to what you are eating and drinking. Diet can have a profound effect on your voiding patterns. Stay away from caffeine, alcohol, and artificial sweeteners. These are known bladder irritants. Make sure you drink plenty of water. Many people who have bladder control problems reduce the amount of liquids they drink in the hope that they will need to urinate less often. Some fail to hydrate as they would like simply because they are in unfamiliar areas without beverages frequently accessible. While less liquid through the mouth does result in less liquid in the form of urine, the smaller amount of urine may be more highly concentrated and, thus, irritating to the bladder surface. Highly concentrated (dark yellow, strong-smelling) urine may cause you to go to the bathroom more frequently, and it encourages growth of bacteria.

Do not let your bladder control your life. If you are experiencing bladder control loss and you haven’t spoken to your doctor or healthcare provider about it you need to do so now. Help is available for everyone. More and more new treatments are successfully used for all types of incontinence. Improvement begins with you and continues through active participation in your treatment program.

How TO Be Prepared In A New Environment

How To Be Prepared In a New Environment

Going to a new place or an event you’ve never been to, can be challenging if you struggle with continence. Not only do you need to consider the normal variables when you’re on the way, like weather and parking, but once you get there you might want to be alert to restrooms, exits, vending machines, and customer service personnel.

Here’s our best advice for being able to find what you need in a new setting:

  • Check out the location’s website and see if the page offers a web tour so you can get a lay of the land
  • Call ahead and ask for the manager. Ask them to spend five minutes going over the basic locations of your highest need items
  • Arrive an additional 15 minutes early and give yourself your own tour
  • Introduce yourself to staff and ask them about any quirks or maintenance that may cause areas of need to be closed or filed off

At the end of the day, you’re just avoiding surprises. Everyone has similar needs when they go out to new places, so be proactive about ways you can improve your experience in a new place.