Advanced Therapies For Overactive Bladder

Advanced Therapies For Overactive Bladder (OAB)

All month long we’ve been talking about ways to treat Overactive Bladder – that urgent need to go to the bathroom many times per day (and sometimes night!).  If you have OAB, you may have tried switching up your diet, adding in pelvic floor exercises, or even trying different types of medications to treat your symptoms. But if those didn’t work (they don’t for everyone) or if the side effects made them difficult to continue, you may want to try some advanced therapies.

What are advanced therapies for OAB?

Percutaneous Tibial Nerve Stimulation

This treatment stimulates the nerve responsible for bladder and pelvic floor function by placing an acupuncture-like needle in the skin near your ankle. During treatment, a device sends mini electrical pulses to the tibial nerve, which changes the activity of the bladder. This is a gradual procedure and must be performed weekly for 12 weeks, and then occasionally as determined by a doctor.  

Sacral neuromodulation

Sacral neuromodulation (SNM) is a procedure that is performed in your doctor’s office and modulates the nerve activity between the brain and the bladder through electric stimulation of the sacral nerve. The sacral nerve delivers signals between the brain and the bladder.  SNM helps to control these signals, so that the bladder functions normally. 

SNM involves 2 phases – an evaluation phase and an implantation phase.  During the evaluation phase, which lasts around 2 weeks and is designed to see if SNM will be a beneficial option to you, a thin, temporary wire is inserted in your lower back, near the sacral nerves, which control the bladder.  A device is connected to the wire, which delivers electric stimulation to the sacral nerves.

Once your doctor has determined that SNM will be effective for you, the wire used during the evaluation period will be removed and a more permanent device, similar to a pacemaker is implanted just under the skin, usually in the buttocks.  Your doctor will monitor you over time, but in most cases, it has shown to be effective in patients for as many as five years.

Both of these options are effective ways to treat Overactive Bladder, if behavioral therapies or medications are not an option for you. 

To learn more about advanced therapies to treat Overactive Bladder, watch our 4th video below from our new series on Managing Overactive Bladder.  Then talk to your doctor to see if an advanced treatment is right for you.

Patient Perspective: Overcoming Overactive Bladder

Overcoming Overactive Bladder

When I was in my early forties, I suddenly found myself rushing to the bathroom constantly. The urge would strike without warning causing me to sprint there lest I want to have an accident everywhere. It wasn’t too big of a deal when I was at home – I was typically able to make it to a bathroom, but when I was in an unfamiliar place, I’d feel panicked until I knew where every toilet in the place was, just in case I needed to make a mad dash to one.

I had been at stay at home mom for the last several years, caring for my youngest daughter, but when she finally started school, I decided it was time to return to the working world. But first, I resolved to get my bladder under control – I didn’t want to be rushing from meeting to meeting with important clients with the fear of peeing my pants.

I visited my doctor and found out that I had Overactive Bladder. It’s where your bladder has sudden spasms that cause you to feel the need to empty it – even if you just went. He prescribed a medication, which helped a lot and made me feel more confident as I returned to work. I’m now exploring a procedure involving nerve stimulation that is supposed to be even more effective and won’t require me to take medications every day. 

I’m so happy I got this treated before returning to work, and wish I would have done it sooner! It would have made heading to the park with my daughter much less daunting! Don’t wait to see a doctor if you have OAB. Turns out there are lots of things that you can do to treat this common (but not normal!) problem.

 

Jane F.

Portland, OR

                                     

What Exactly Is Sacral Neuromodulation?

What Is Sacral Neuromodulation?

For those of us with incontinence, we’ve heard about all the mainstream treatment options available – in fact, we’ve probably tried many of them.  Absorbents are a mainstay in our bags, we’ve been on one or two medications to try to control the problem, and may have even tried physical therapy.  We’ve heard some talk of surgical procedures but just aren’t sure we’re ready for that yet.  But did you know that there are other procedures out there to treat this problem too? Ones that are simple to perform in a doctor’s office? 

Sacral neuromodulation (SNM) is a procedure that is performed in your doctor’s office and modulates the nerve activity between the brain and the bladder through electric stimulation of the sacral nerve. The sacral nerve delivers signals between the brain and the bladder.  SNM helps to control these signals, so that the bladder functions normally. 

SNM involves 2 phases – an evaluation phase and an implantation phase.  During the evaluation phase, which lasts around 2 weeks and is designed to see if SNM will be a beneficial option to you, a thin, temporary wire is inserted in your lower back, near the sacral nerves, which control the bladder.  A device is connected to the wire, which delivers electric stimulation to the sacral nerves.

Once your doctor has determined that SNM will be effective for you, the wire used during the evaluation period will be removed and a more permanent device, similar to a pacemaker is implanted just under the skin, usually in the buttocks.  Your doctor will monitor you over time, but in most cases, it has shown to be effective in patients for as many as five years.

SNM is a good option to consider when other treatments, such as physical therapy and medication, have failed.  To find out more about SNM and if it is right for you, talk to your urologist.

Need help finding a urologist in your area? Use the NAFC Specialist Locator!