Ask The Expert: Are There Other Things Besides Prostate Trouble That Can Cause Incontinence In Men?

Prostate Trouble and Incontinence

Each month, we ask our expert panel to answer one of our reader's questions. To learn more about the NAFC Expert Panel, and how to submit your own question, see below.

Question: Are There Other Things Besides Prostate Trouble That Can Cause Incontinence In Men?

AnswerProstate problems in men typically get the blame for incontinence issues for good reason – many men experience issues with their prostate (BPH, prostate cancer) which can often cause incontinence, even if it’s just for a brief time. But there are other conditions that may be contributing to the root of the issue as well. Being overweight can put extra pressure on the bladder, which may cause leaks. Certain foods can also irritate the bladder, causing incontinence – especially if you’re already prone to the condition.  Additionally, neurological conditions, such as Parkinson’s or diabetes can lead to neurogenic bladder, where the brain is unable to communicate properly with the bladder. Even still, urinary tract infections or blockages can lead to bladder troubles.

The most important thing to consider is that incontinence is generally a symptom of something else, and can almost always be treated. If you’re experiencing bladder leaks, see your doctor today and ask for help. Your doctor will be able to dig deeper to find the root cause of your incontinence and work with you to find a solution.   

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Incontinence During Sex - It Happens To Men Too

Incontinence During Sex Happens To Men Too

Prostate cancer is one of the most common types of cancer in men. According to the American Cancer Society, 1 in 7 men will get prostate cancer in their lifetime (only skin cancer has a higher rate).  And, while many men will go on to survive prostate cancer, the side effects of treatment can be difficult to deal with for many.

A common treatment for prostate cancer is a radical prostatectomy, or the complete removal of the prostate.  This is generally considered a good approach especially if the cancer is contained within the prostate gland and has not spread.  However, one side effect of this procedure is often incontinence.

Stress urinary incontinence, the type of incontinence that happens when you place pressure on the bladder, is common for men who have had their prostate removed or are undergoing other treatments for prostate cancer.  Treatment can sometimes weaken the bladder muscles, causing leakage when a man sneezes, coughs, exercises, or even during sex.  This can be extremely embarrassing for men, and can be discouraging when going through the healing process of having a prostatectomy. The good news is that many men regain full control of their bladder with time after a prostatectomy.

here are 4 tips that may help you avoid some awkward situations in the bedroom:

  • Try to watch your fluid intake in the hours leading up to sex.

  • Avoid consuming bladder irritating food and drinks, such as caffeine, chocolate, or alcohol.

  • Prior to sex, completely empty your bladder.

  • Keep a thick towel nearby in case of any accidents

While this problem can be an embarrassing one, keep in mind that many men deal with this in the months after prostate cancer treatment and with time, this condition should improve.  If you still experience problems a few months after your treatment, talk to your urologist about treatments for incontinence.  He or she can help you navigate the many options available to you and find one that fits best with your needs.

Prostate Cancer: The Case For Watchful Waiting

Prostate Cancer; The Case For Watchful Waiting

Prostate cancer is one of the leading cancer causes of death in men in the US.  The American Cancer Society estimates that approximately 1 in 7 men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer in his lifetime.  But, while this is a widespread condition, and treatment is sometimes warranted, the medical industry has begun to see a shift in the prostate cancer treatment, choosing to actively monitor patients over time instead of choosing to perform surgery or conduct radiation immediately.  This treatment path is called “watchful waiting”, and is becoming more and more common for men with prostate cancer.

To understand why watchful waiting is becoming a more popular trend, let’s back up a bit and explain a little more about the diagnosis of prostate cancer.  The average age of men diagnosed with prostate cancer is 66 years old.  Common treatment options for prostate cancer have included medication, surgery to remove the prostate, chemotherapy, radiation, and even hormone therapy.  And while these treatments have become more and more effective over the years, they cause unwanted side effects (such as incontinence and impotence) and pose serious risks (like blood clots in the legs and lungs, heart attack, pneumonia, and infections.)

There has been much debate around whether or not the benefits of treatment outweigh the added side effects and risks that are introduced when one undergoes these types of therapies.  Additionally, it is not clear if these treatment options will completely eliminate the cancer.  For those patients who are low risk, the benefit of aggressive treatment compared to the potential side effects may just not be worth it. 

What types of patients may be good candidates for watchful waiting?  Those who are not seeing any symptoms from the cancer, those whose cancer is small, and located only in the prostate, and those whose cancer is expected to grow slowly all may benefit from this type of treatment. 

Additionally, older men who have a life expectancy of less than 10 years may not benefit from the added years that surgery can offer, making them a better candidate for watchful waiting. 

However, if the cancer is growing steadily, or spreading beyond the prostate, more aggressive treatment is usually recommended.  Men who are diagnosed young may also benefit from more aggressive treatment, as there is a greater chance that the cancer may grow worse over a longer span of time.

Whatever stage you are at, only you and your doctor can decide what is best for you.  Be sure to talk with him or her about the risks and benefits associated with each treatment path prior to making a final decision. 

Know The Symptoms Of Prostate Cancer

Know The Symptoms Of Prostate Cancer

Know The Symptoms Of Prostate Cancer

Apart from skin cancer, prostate is the most common cancer among men.  And while a large number of men are diagnosed with the condition each year, the survival rate for prostate cancer is generally high if caught early on. There are no warning signs, which is why it is important for men to begin getting screened for prostate cancer at age 50.  However, common symptoms often emerge once the cancer has already started.  These may include any of the following:

  • Frequent urination
  • Weak urine stream
  • Inability to empty the bladder
  • Leaking urine
  • UTI’s, which may feel like a burning sensation during urination or ejaculation
  • Blood in the urine or semen
  • Erectile dysfunction
  • Bone pain or discomfort, especially in pelvis or lower part of the body

It’s important to note that many of the above symptoms can have other causes too.  Enlarged prostate can cause many of the same symptoms as prostate cancer due to the extra pressure placed on the urethra.  Talk to your doctor about any symptoms you’re experiencing so he or she can determine the appropriate course of action.

Need help finding a physician? Use the NAFC Specialist Locator to find one near you.

The Basics of Benign Prostate Hyperplasia

BPH

The prostate is a walnut shaped gland responsible for producing semen in a man’s reproductive system. Enlargement of this gland is pretty typical, as most men experience some enlargement of the prostate as they age. Statistically, about 50% of men experience symptoms of an enlarged prostate by age 60, and 90% of men report symptoms by age 85.

You might be wondering, "If it’s so common, what’s the big deal about having benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH)?"

To begin with, a healthy prostate is important in supporting sperm nourishment and transport. When a man ejaculates, the prostate produces the semen that propels the sperm. In a post-pubescent male, the prostate is about the size of a walnut and stays that way until age 40. For a still unknown reason, the prostate experiences a second growth spurt and can grow to the size of an apricot or even a lemon.

When you take into account that the prostate gland is located just below the bladder at the site where the urethra connects, you can start to see how this can become a serious issue. The enlarged prostate begins to interfere with the urethra, the tube inside the penis that carries urine and semen out of the body. The pressure can block the natural flow of urine (and semen) causing irritation. If left untreated, this condition can lead to more serious problems.

There is not a consensus among physicians on exactly why the prostate begins to grow again, though it is widely speculated that an excess of certain hormones may be the catalyst. One study has shown a high correlation between DHT levels (dihydrotestosterone) in the blood and enlarged prostates. Conversely, men with low DHT levels do not experience enlarged prostates.

The best way to combat this growth is to talk to your doctor. Click here to read about some of the potential exams, treatments, and solutions.