How Can You Show Gratitude Toward Yourself And Others?

Showing gratitude toward yourself and others isn’t just being grateful for positive things and moments in life, but also cutting yourself and others a break from the endless expectations life brings. When you’re dealing with incontinence, it’s even more important to look outside your body’s limitations. Being grateful for the abilities you do have and sharing that gratitude with others is known to increase personal happiness and lessen the chances of feeling depressed.

How To Show Gratitude Toward Yourself And Others

How To Show Gratitude Toward Yourself And Others

We’ve gathered our best practices for living a grateful life below. Share your practices in the comments!

Say ‘thank you’ and mean it. Be specific!

The key to telling people thank you isn’t just muttering the words ‘thank you,’ but being specific about what you’re grateful for. Instead of saying ‘Thanks for helping me today,” say, “Thank you for talking out the trash this evening. Your willingness to chip in on that chore really helped me focus on getting dinner on the table.”

Write yourself a compliment and leave it where you can read it

Showering yourself with words of affirmation and encouragement is just as important as doing it for others.  Self-gratitude and self-affirmation builds confidence and assurance in one’s abilities. Learning how to do this is hard, but start by leaving notes for yourself.

Read one caregiver blogger’s thoughts on the issue here.

Offer your time and skills to a family member

Nothing shows gratitude for someone else more than your time. Use one of your greatest (and free-of-charge) gifts and show your loved ones how much they matter to you by spending quality time with them.

Invite a sibling to coffee or take a parent out to dinner!

Click here to read other ways to express gratitude on a daily basis. 

Staying Young With A Positive Outlook

stay young with a positive outlook!

Getting older is inevitable. It will happen to us all at one point, but just because we’re all aging doesn’t mean our life has to decline. The power of positivity is a real thing, and research shows that those who are optimistic about getting older, and who follow the mantra “you’re only as old as you feel” actually do fare better than those who are more likely to attribute aches and pain to old age.

In a study from the Journal of American Medical Association, researchers looked at the effects of positive age stereotypes to see what effect it had on helping people recover from certain disabilities. Participants (aged 70 years or older) were asked to relay 5 words or phrases that came to mind when they thought of old people. None of the participants had a disability prior to the initial questioning, but they did experience at least one month of disability during the 11-year follow up. The people who had given more positive age stereotypes were 44% more likely to fully recover from severe disability and were able to perform daily activities better as they aged than those with negative age stereotypes.

Positive thinking does matter. Even as we age, we are still in control of our own life. How we view it, and our health, make a big difference.  Nothing could be truer when considering a condition like incontinence. At NAFC, we hear from people all the time who think incontinence is simply a part of getting older. They’ve already resigned themselves to the fact that it will happen and there is nothing that can be done. But that is simply not true. (And if you follow this blog we hope you know that by now!) Lifestyle changes, medication, simple medical procedures, and even surgery can often correct the problem (or at least greatly improve the symptoms).  Don’t let your health decline simply because you’re marking another year on the calendar. Take charge of your wellbeing and attack any health concerns head on now, to enjoy a long and happy life.

Here’s a quick exercise to try each day.

Close your eyes and think of a time when you were at your optimal health. Think of your vibrancy at that age, your energy, how you felt. Now think of yourself as that age – not just in this exercise, but throughout your day. Associate yourself with that vibrant, younger version in everything you do. And, if research is correct, you may just start noticing the difference!

Have some tips to share on how you “think yourself young”? Share them in the comments below!