Bladder Health and Sex

Bladder Health and Sex

Understanding what is normal during sex and what is unusual can be challenging. After all, sex is a very private experience and differs for every person. Generally speaking, there is no reason for your bladder to empty during sex or for you to feel extreme discomfort or experience pain during sex.

As you can guess, the health of your bladder can directly affect your sex life. 

Two common reasons individuals experience pain or discomfort with their bladder during or after sex are: bladder pain syndrome and stress urinary incontinence.

Interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome (IC/BPS)

Bladder pain syndrome is the continual sensation of pressure or pain on the bladder. This syndrome typically affects women and leaves individuals feeling as if they have to urinate when they don’t have any urine to pass.

Consider making dietary changes and practicing bladder retraining so your bladder begins to hold more urine before experiencing the urge to go.

Relax before engaging in sex to ensure as little stress as possible. Stress can cause flare-ups and trigger discomfort.

Stress Urinary Incontinence

Stress Urinary Incontinence or SUI occurs because of weak pelvic floor muscles and/or a deficient urethral sphincter. This weakness can cause the bladder to leak during exercise, coughing, sneezing, laughing, or any body movement that puts pressure on the bladder. If sex is particular jarring, SUI can be affected.

Consider exercises to strengthen your pelvic floor and limit caffeine intake. Always empty your bladder before sex.

We hope this peek into how your bladder health can impact sex was helpful. If you have experienced any of the symptoms noted above and haven’t talked to your doctor, it’s time to schedule an appointment. Additionally, we feel it’s important to share your health with your partner if you continue to have sex while experiencing some of these bladder health concerns.

Join us on our forum to talk more and learn how others have dealt with issues like these.  

What Is Pelvic Pain Disorder?

What Is Pelvic Pain Disorder?

Pelvic pain is pain that you experience in the lowermost part of your abdomen and pelvis. It can occur in both men and women, however it is more common in women.  Depending on the specific cause of pelvic pain, it can vary in intensity and length.  There are several things that may contribute to pelvic pain.  

Many women experience pelvic pain due to gynecological problems or problems associated with pregnancy.  Some of these include: 

  • Endometriosis

  • Adenomyosis

  • Menstrual cramps (dysmenorrhea)

  • Ectopic pregnancy (or other pregnancy-related conditions)

  • Ovarian cancer

  • Vulvodynia

  • Mittelschmerz (ovulation pain)

  • Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID)

  • Ovarian cysts

  • Uterine fibroids

Some other causes of pelvic pain may be due to:

  • Diverticulitis

  • Appendicitis

  • Fibromyalgia

  • Colon cancer

  • Chronic constipation

  • Inguinal hernia

  • Crohn's disease

How is the cause of pelvic pain determined?

Talking to a doctor is the first step in determining the cause of your pelvic pain.  Your doctor will start off by asking you several questions about the type of pain you are experiencing, and also discuss your medical history to determine the cause.  He or she will also likely perform a physical exam and may perform some tests to figure out what is causing your pain. Depending on what you are experiencing, your doctor may check your blood, urine or stool, perform a pregnancy test, check for STDs, or even perform X-rays or Ultrasounds to better examine some of your internal organs.  

How is pelvic pain treated?

Your doctor will determine the appropriate treatment for your pelvic pain based on the cause, and how serious the pain is. They may recommend medications, or even surgical procedures.  Talk with your doctor about what you are experiencing to find the best solution.