Ask The Expert: Should Men Do Kegels?

Should Men Do Kegels?

Question: I hear about kegels for women all the time, but what about men? Can kegels benefit men too?

Expert Answer: Absolutely!  Kegels are an important part of a woman’s workout routine to prevent or manage bladder leaks, but they are just as important for men. In men, kegels can help with fecal incontinence, overactive bladder, urinary retention, erectile functioning and even orgasms.  Interested in seeing the benefits for yourself? Here’s how to do them:

How To Do Kegels For Men

There are two types of kegel exercises that you can do to strengthen and tone your pelvic floor muscles.

Long Contractions.  

Long Contractions work on the supportive strength of the muscles. To perform a long kegel contraction, tighten your pelvic muscles and hold for 5 seconds. This may be difficult at first – don’t worry if you can’t hold the contraction for the full five seconds. With practice you’ll be able to work up to this.

Overtime, work your way up to 10 seconds per contraction. Be sure to rest for 10 seconds in between each contraction – knowing how to relax your muscle is as important as the contraction.

Short Contractions.  

Short contractions work the fast twitch muscles that work quickly to stop the flow of urine and prevent leaks. To perform a short contraction, tighten your muscles quickly, then release, and repeat.

When Should I Perform Them?

Like any muscle, you don’t want to do too much too soon. Aim for 5 reps of both short and long contractions, 3x per day on your first day. As you gain more confidence and strength, work your way up to 10 reps, 3x per day of each.

Continue practicing kegels and you should see improvements in 3-6 months. And, if you find that you need some help with kegels, talk to your doctor or physical therapist. They will be able to provide you with more personal instruction, which may include biofeedback therapy.

Good luck!

Men And Kegels - The Ultimate Guide

Men's Ultimate Guide To Kegels

Kegel exercises have long been associated with women – something that they do during pregnancy and post childbirth to tone up their pelvic floors and prevent or ease incontinence symptoms. But Men, if you haven’t tried kegels, you’re truly missing out. Not only can they help ease bladder leakage if you have it, experts claim that they can also give you a stronger erection and orgasm. Want to learn more? Keep reading.

What are Kegels and what muscles do they work?

Kegels are basically the contracting of the muscles in your pelvic floor. Your pelvic floor is comprised of a tightly woven web of muscles, located in the base of the pelvis between the pubic bone and tailbone. These muscles have three main functions:

  1. They help support the pelvic organs such as the bladder, the intestines and the rectum.
  2. They help control bladder and bowel function and can prevent or ease symptoms of bladder leakage.
  3. They are involved in sexual functionality.

As with any other muscle in the body, if they get weak, they can no longer perform their job. These muscles can naturally stretch and become weaker over time, but with proper exercise they can remain strong to ensure good sexual and bladder health and function.

How do kegels benefit me? 

Kegels can address a number of issues that men may face related to their bladder or bowel.

Bladder Leaks. 

Urinary incontinence is a condition that affects as many as 15% of men aged 15-64, and may be caused by a number of health conditions. The most common cause of incontinence in men is due to problems with the prostate, but other conditions can affect bladder function as well. Incontinence in men can range from a small amount of leakage after urination, or more substantial leaking when performing physical activity or placing stress on the bladder (laughing, coughing, working out, lifting heavy items).  A Kegel regimen can help to tone these muscles to prevent the leaks from happening.

Fecal Incontinence.

As with urinary incontinence, weakening of the pelvic floor muscles can also affect the anus and rectum, resulting in loss of bowel control. But, kegel exercises can help to tone and strengthen this area up as well to prevent bowel leakage.

Overactive Bladder.

You’ve probably seen a million pharmaceutical commercials for what’s known as Overactive Bladder – the urgent and frequent need to empty your bladder. When you have an overactive bladder, the muscles of the bladder contract involuntarily, creating an urgent need to urinate. Performing kegels can help improve control of these muscles, improving, or even eliminating the chance bladder leakage.

Urinary Retention.

Ever had difficulty starting a stream of urine? How about a weak flow, and the feeling that you need to urinate again right after you’ve finished? It could be urinary retention, which is usually caused by a blockage in the urinary tract, or nerve problems that interfere with signals between the brain and the bladder.  Bladder retraining is one method that can be used to help fix this, but kegels can also help the nerves and muscles used in emptying the bladder to work better.

Erectile Functioning.

Erectile Dysfunction, or ED, can be caused by many physical conditions (heart disease, diabetes), or can be the result of surgery (like prostate removal) or trauma. The good news is that you don’t have to resort to medications to treat it – kegel exercises can help strengthen your muscles in your pelvic region and regain normal function. In men, kegels specifically help strengthen the bulbocavernous muscle.  This is the muscle that is responsible for erections, contractions during orgasm and ejaculation, and emptying the urethra after urination. Studies have found that regular practice of kegels can keep this muscle strong, and if you’re experiencing problems, kegels may improve your symptoms.

Ejaculation & Orgasm. 

Again, this goes back to the bulbocavernous muscle – the stronger the muscle, the stronger the contractions you’ll have during orgasm. Enough said.

How do I do a kegel?

First, you need to locate the right muscles, which is often the hardest part. The next time you’re urinating, try stopping the flow mid-stream. If you can do that, you’ve found the right muscle. (But don’t do this on a regular basis – this should only be done when trying to locate the correct muscles.)

There are two types of kegel exercises that you can do to strengthen and tone your pelvic floor muscles.

Long Contractions.  Long Contractions work on the supportive strength of the muscles. To perform a long kegel contraction, tighten your pelvic muscles and hold for 5 seconds. This may be difficult at first – don’t worry if you can’t hold the contraction for the full five seconds. With practice you’ll be able to work up to this.

Overtime, work your way up to 10 seconds per contraction. Be sure to rest for 10 seconds in between each contraction – knowing how to relax your muscle is as important as the contraction.

Short Contractions.  Short contractions work the fast twitch muscles that work quickly to stop the flow of urine and prevent leaks. To perform a short contraction, tighten your muscles quickly, then release, and repeat.

When should I perform them?

Like any muscle, you don’t want to do too much too soon. Aim for 5 reps of both short and long contractions, 3x per day on your first day. As you gain more confidence and strength, work your way up to 10 reps, 3x per day of each.

It may take time to see changes, but consistency is key here. Continue practicing kegels and you should see improvements in 3-6 months. And, if you find that you need some help with kegels, talk to your doctor or physical therapist. They will be able to provide you with more personal instruction, which may include biofeedback therapy.

Pelvic Floor Exercises Specifically For Men

Pelvic Floor Exercises Specifically For Men

Pelvic Floor Exercises Specifically For Men

A guest blog written by Michelle Herbst, PT

As a physical therapist specializing in pelvic floor rehabilitation we are referred to as women’s health physical therapists. But, this a little of a misnomer as men have pelvic floors and can have concerns too. In my experience, men participating in pelvic floor rehabilitation make the best patients. They are engaged, compliant and determined to positively affect their condition.  

Kegels for Men:

Kegels for men can help with erectile dysfunction and urinary and fecal incontinence. They are most effective when performed in a consistent, specific manner and progressed slowly over time. Here are a few ideas and tips for men to consider when performing kegels.

A kegel is a contraction of the pelvic floor muscles. It feels like a gentle pulling up and in of the pelvic floor followed by a relaxation of the entire muscle group. The kegel contraction begins with a slight lift of the tail bone moving forward as a gentle tightening of the muscles between and tail bone and pubic bone. Lastly, the lower abdominals contract slightly. Then the muscles gently release or relax. There may be a feeling of a reversal of the contraction sequence.

There is no need for weights as our body weight and gravity provide resistance. The contraction is a sub-maximal in effort. If kegels are performed too hard and too fast the result may be muscle soreness and aggravation of symptoms. Performing a submaximal contraction is key and mild muscle soreness may be expected.

Avoid breath holding when kegeling. Repetitive contraction of the pelvic floor while holding the breath could aggravate prior back injuries or make pelvic floor symptoms worse. Normal breathing is the standard when kegeling. Your face should not be turning red. After normal breathing while kegeling is mastered you can further enhance the kegel during exhalation. A long exhalation during a kegel - such as you would blowing out a candle - can allow you to improve muscle performance. Here, give it a try: gently tighten the pelvic floor – take a deep breath in and slowing exhale like you are blowing out a candle while holding the kegel muscle contraction. Then release.

Kegels should be progressed gradually and can be progressed by increasing the hold time and number of repetitions. For example, when you first begin kegeling, you will want to measure how long you can hold the muscle contraction before the muscles ‘give away’ and release the kegel. If you can hold one kegel for 3 seconds, without breath holding, use that as your benchmark for holding time.  Next, work your way up to 10 contractions of 3-second holds. Repeat another set of 10 later in the day. Eventually you may work up to completing multiple sets of 10, 3 to 5 times per day while advancing the kegel-hold time to 10 seconds. And, please remember to relax between each consecutive kegel to avoid moderate muscle soreness.

Try kegeling in different positions. Use the above suggestions of progressing the kegel hold time and repetition and apply to your place in space. The combined effect of body weight and gravity can increase the resistance and difficulty of the kegel. For example, if you have been performing your kegels while lying down, try to perform them in a seated position, followed by standing and during your daily activities.

Lastly, consistency and patience are key. If you don’t take your medicine you will not get well. Continue to perform your kegels daily while your symptoms are improving and to maintain your gains. Be creative and patient with progressing kegels. Depending on your starting point it may take weeks or months to progress to performing multiple repetitions in functional positions. Do not give up too soon. Kegels - they are not just for women and can greatly improve a man’s overall health and quality of life. Give them a try.

 
Michelle Herbst, PT

Michelle Herbst, PT