Surgery For Overactive Bladder

Surgical Options For Overactive Bladder

Overactive Bladder at its best (is there really such a thing?) can be annoying. The constant running to the bathroom can be frustrating to say the least. But at its worst, OAB can be debilitating. Those with severe OAB make multiple trips to the bathroom a day and even night, and many times may have embarrassing accidents too.  It can cause anxiety in social situations, limit interaction with friends and family, and can even negatively affect a person’s work. If you think you’ve tried everything and it hasn’t worked for you, surgery may be an option.

Surgery is typically a last resort for most people and should be considered only after more conservative options, such as behavioral modifications, medication or even advanced therapies like Sacral Neuromodulation have failed.  The surgeries listed below are often done on women who no longer wish to have children, as childbirth can often remove many of the benefits of surgery.   

What types of surgeries are available?

Augmentation Cystoplasty

This procedure increases the size of the bladder, enabling the bladder to store more urine. A small amount of tissue is typically taken from the intestine and added to the wall of the bladder to make it bigger. In some cases, a catheter may be needed after this surgery has been performed.

Urinary Diversion

This procedure takes the tubes that lead from the kidneys to the bladder, and reroutes them through the abdominal wall to the outside of the body. Urine is then collected in an ostomy bag – a specially designed bag to be worn on the abdomen. While this option does require maintenance (emptying the bag, keeping the area clean and safe from infection) it does allow an active life post surgery. 

Sling Procedure

Vaginal sling procedures are surgeries that help control stress urinary incontinence, which happens when you leak urine upon coughing, laughing, sneezing, lifting or exercising. The basic concept of a sling is to place a strong piece of material beneath the urethra as a supporting “hammock”. During the procedure, physicians use a sling placed around the urethra to lift it, or the bladder, back into a normal position.

There are many different types of sling procedures, as well as a number of different sling materials available, so talk to your doctor about your options, as well as the pros and cons for each one.

Is surgery for me?

The decision to have surgery can be difficult, as there are pros and cons with each procedure. But, if your OAB symptoms are severe, and you have tried all other options, surgery may be right for you. Be sure to talk with your doctor about all of your options, including what the procedure is like, the materials used, the pros and cons of different surgical options, and the recovery times for each.  It’s also important to talk with your doctor about what you can expect after surgery, as not everyone is completely cured from incontinence after these procedures.  A frank discussion with your doctor, and your own research on surgical options can help you decide if this is a path you would like to consider.

 Learn more about surgery options for OAB in our 6th and final video of our series on managing Overactive Bladder. 

NAFC's Getting Started Guide For Managing Incontinence

NAFC's Step By Step Guide To Managing Incontinence

NAFC's Step By Step Guide To Managing Incontinence

If you’re new to this whole incontinence game, you may wonder how on earth you’re going to manage. Preventing leaks, keeping things clean, and navigating the isles of adult absorbent products at the grocery store are all probably top of mind right now, and rightly so. These are often the first steps people take when trying to manage bladder leaks.

But what comes next? And how do you even begin to tackle those items we just listed above?

We have you covered. NAFC has dedicated a whole section of our website to just getting started (which, to be honest, is often the hardest part). We’ve outlined the things you should do before you even make your first appointment to see your doctor (which you should do anyway, even if you complete all the steps we outline in our Getting Started Guide). 

Getting Started Guide For Managing Incontinence

 

This guide covers the basic steps, from how to keep a bladder diary, finding the right absorbent product, practicing pelvic floor strengthening moves, retraining your bladder or bowel, and a look at the vast array of options you have available to you for managing incontinence.

So take a look around, and start implementing some of these tips!  Begin with the first step:  finding an immediate way to manage your condition with absorbent products.   Then move on to the other helpful tips.

How Smoking Contributes To Incontinence

How Smoking Contributes To Incontinence

We all know that cigarette smoking  is bad for us. But did you know that it can also lead to incontinence?  

Studies have shown that smokers are at an increased risk for incontinence.  Over time, many smokers develop a chronic cough, which can put an enormous amount of pressure on the pelvic muscles, causing them to weaken and increasing the chance of stress incontinence. Additionally, smokers also experience more frequent urges to use the restroom, as smoking is an irritant to the bladder. Even more alarming, it’s been shown that smoking can also lead to bladder cancer.

What’s a smoker to do?

The obvious fix is to quit smoking – not only to alleviate or prevent incontinence, but for a host of other health reasons as well. 

While quitting is not easy, there are a few things you can do to help you succeed:

  1. Talk to your doctor. Your doctor can help give you tips to quit, and may suggest medication or programs that can help. 
  2. Get the support of your family and friends. Tell your loved ones what you are trying to do so that they can support you and give you the encouragement you need when you are feeling tempted to smoke.
  3. Avoid your triggers. Many people feel the urge to smoke during certain activities – grabbing drinks with friends, at certain times of the day, etc. Try to avoid these activities for a while or find ways to stay busy during your usual smoking times.
  4. Take up a hobby. With all the time you’ll save by not smoking, you may be able to finally start that project or hobby you’ve been thinking about. Doing something with your hands (knitting, woodworking, etc.)may also help keep you busy and help you avoid the urge to pick up a cigarette.

Smoking is a hard habit to quit for many people. But with determination and perseverance, it can be done. And it’s never too late to see the benefits of quitting – a recent study showed that even smokers who quit in their 60’s saw an increase in their lifespan.

Have any tips for quitting? Please share them with our readers in the comments below!

3 Things You Can Do RIGHT NOW To Fight Incontinence

Three things you can do right now to fight incontinence

While most people wait until January to start making resolutions, we at NAFC feel that it’s always a good time for positive change. 

Here are three things you can do RIGHT NOW if you are dealing with incontinence.

1. Watch your diet. 

Yes, we know it’s the holidays and this is probably the last thing you want to hear, but ensuring you’re eating and drinking healthy foods is very important when you have incontinence. Sugar, caffeine, alcohol – these are all common triggers for those with incontinence so be careful when you consume them. Learn your triggers by keeping a bladder diary for a few days to see if you notice a pattern in what you’re eating or drinking and your incontinence. Often, modifying your diet can be a very simple step in incontinence management.

Tip:  If you do get the urge to indulge this holiday season, try to limit it to just one or two days.  There is often an urge to binge on not-so-great-for-you foods throughout the full month of December, but limiting yourself to a couple of days can help keep things in check.

2. Find an absorbent product that fits you.  Many people suffer from leaks even when they use protection. The key to overcoming this is to find a product that is comfortable to you and that fits well.  A product that is too big, or too small, can cause leakage.  And pay attention to the packaging – getting a product that isn’t designed specifically for incontinence will do you no good and just leave you feeling frustrated.

3. Make an appointment to see your doctor after the holidays.  Yes, it’s probably the last thing on your mind right now, but by making the decision to talk to someone about your incontinence you’re taking matters into your own hands.  Plus, lining up a doctor visit now will ensure that you stat 2017 off on a good note.

Tip:  Need help finding a doctor? Use our specialist locator to find one in your area.