Treatments For Neurogenic Bladder

Treatment Options For Neurogenic Bladder

Having a neurological condition, such as Multiple Sclerosis or Parkinson’s disease can be overwhelming, both physically and emotionally.  But one thing many people may not realize is how it will affect their bladder. Luckily, there are treatments available that can help to minimize symptoms of neurogenic bladder and allow you to live without the fear of an accident. Today, we’re going to discuss what neurogenic bladder is, and 2 ways you can treat it.  

What Is Neurogenic Bladder? 

Neurogenic bladder affects many Americans and occurs when there is a problem with the way your brain communicates with your bladder. People who have a neurogenic bladder usually experience a bladder that is either overactive (spastic) or underactive (flaccid).

 

What are the symptoms of a neurogenic bladder?

There are many symptoms of a neurogenic bladder. These include: 

  • Incontinence

  • Urinary Tract Infections (UTIs)

  • Frequent urination

  • An urgent need to use the empty the bladder immediately

  • Painful urination

  • The inability to completely empty the bladder

  • A weak urine stream

  • Nocturia, the need to empty the bladder more than once per night

 

What treatment options exist for Neurogenic Bladder?

Luckily, there are many treatment options for Neurogenic Bladder.

Behavioral modifications.

Certain foods and drinks are known bladder irritants and may contribute to an overactive bladder. Try keeping a bladder diary to identify any triggers that may be causing your bladder problems and then work to avoid them. Additionally, maintaining a healthy weight through diet and exercise can help ease pressure placed on the bladder and also strengthen the pelvic floor muscles used to control bladder function. 

Self Catheterization.

Many people with neurogenic bladders use a catheter to control their bladder. A catheter is a thin tube that is inserted into the urethra and then into the bladder to allow urine to drain from the bladder.  While using a catheter may sound a little intimidating at first, most people are able to master the process quickly and it can provide a great deal of freedom for those struggling with bladder control.

Pharmaceutical Options.

There are a number of pharmaceutical options available – both prescription and over the counter. Always talk with your doctor before trying something new.   

Botox Injections.

It’s not just for wrinkles!  Botox is also approved for overactive bladder (spastic bladders). Your doctor will inject botox into the bladder muscle, where it helps to block the nerve signals that trigger OAB, or spastic bladder.  Many people find this reduces leaks and the number of times you need to urinate each day. It also helps with that urgent feeling of needing to empty the bladder. 

Surgery

If all else fails, there are different surgeries available to treat neurogenic bladder.  Bladder augmentation is a surgical procedure to make the bladder larger. This helps reduce the pressure in the bladder, and reduce leaks.

If you’re living with Neurogenic Bladder, talk with your doctor about treatment options. Need help finding a qualified specialist? Try our Doctor Finder!

 

Treating Overactive Bladder With Medications Or Injections

Treating Overactive Bladder With Medications Or Injections

Do you live with symptoms of Overactive Bladder (OAB)? The urgent, frequent need to go to the bathroom? If so, you’re not alone. Nearly 33 million Americans live with Overactive Bladder. And while it may not seem like a big deal to some, to those who live with the condition it can be frustrating and embarrassing – especially when those symptoms cause you to have an accident.  

Throughout our series on OAB this month, we’ve been talking about different ways to manage OAB symptoms. You can try simple things like altering your diet, and adding in different types of exercise, but if you don’t see improvements with those steps, medication may be a good option for you.

How medication works to treat OAB 

Overactive bladder is caused when the bladder muscles involuntarily contract. This makes you feel like you have to go to the bathroom, even if you just went, and can sometimes even cause leakage if you’re not able to make it in time. There are a few different types of medication to treat Overactive Bladder.

Anticholinergic drugs work by blocking the signal to your bladder that causes the contractions that create that urgent need to go RIGHT NOW! With the signal blocked the need to release urine is reduced so those many, urgent trips to the bathroom are lessened as well.

Beta-3 adrenergic drugs work by relaxing the smooth muscle that surrounds the bladder, which increases the bladder’s ability to hold more urine, meaning less trips to the bathroom. 

Both of these types of medications have been shown to effectively treat Overactive Bladder, but some people can experience side effects, such as dry mouth, blurry vision, or constipation.  Some of the medications also interact with other types of meds, so be sure to tell your doctor everything you’re taking.

Botox® injections for OAB

Botox® injections are also an option for treating Overactive Bladder.  Injecting Botox, or onabotulinumtoxinA, into the bladder muscle blocks the nerve signal that triggers OAB, reducing the urgent need to urinate and the number of times you need to empty your bladder each day. A small percentage of people using botox have found the need to use a catheter if they experience urinary retention, and repeat injections may need to be performed.

For a list of the specific types of medications to treat OAB, click here.

If you’re living with symptoms of Overactive Bladder, like frequency and urgency, watch the below video about managing OAB with Medications, our 4th video in a series about treating Overactive Bladder.  Then talk with your doctor to see if medications may be an option for you.

Watch This Video Of How Botox Helped A Woman With MS Battle Neurogenic Bladder

If you're reading this article, you, or someone you know, have likely dealt with some form of incontinence before. It's a common occurrence (more common than most think!), and can be a source of daily annoyance, shame and fear in our lives. 

For those living with Multiple Sclerosis (MS), bladder dysfunction is often present and can greatly affect the quality of one's life. Symptoms such as hesitation, interrupted or weak flow, incomplete emptying, incontinence, frequency, and pain are reported by many who suffer from MS.  However, there is hope.  Many treatments are available to those living with this condition.  Watch the videos below to see how Amy, an MS sufferer, bravely describes her struggles with neurogenic bladder, and her amazing transformation after she started treating it with Botox. 

Amy's Before Video

Amy's After Video

Ask The Expert: Botox for OAB

Each month, we ask our expert panel to answer one of our reader's questions. To learn more about the NAFC Expert Panel, and how to submit your own question, see below.

Question: I’ve heard that Botox can help with OAB – is this true?  I thought Botox was used for wrinkles!

Answer: Yes! Besides being used to treat wrinkles, Botox has also been approved to treat Overactive Bladder symptoms, such as the strong need to urinate, urgency, urgency incontinence, and frequency of using the bathroom.  When you have OAB, your bladder muscles contract uncontrollably and you feel the frequent need to empty your bladder.  Botox works by blocking the signals that trigger OAB, and is administered with a small tube (cystoscope) that is inserted through the urethra. BOTOX goes through a small needle into multiple areas of your bladder muscle. Treatments take only about an hour in your doctor’s office and may be needed as few as 1-2 times per year.  Botox can provide significant relief to patients suffering from OAB by reducing many of the symptoms normally experienced, including leakage.  BOTOX should be administered by a trained specialist such as a Urologist or Urogynecologist.  To find a specialist  near you, visit the NAFC Specialist Locator.

The NAFC Expert Panel is made up of some of the top medical professionals in the fields of urology, urogynecology, physical therapy, and surgery. Each month, the experts weigh in on important topics and answers to your questions.  To have one of your questions featured in our Ask an Expert series, send it to us here.