NAFC Downloadable Resources - Tips & Brochures To Help Keep You Dry

Here at the National Association For Continence, we understand that people learn in different ways. While we see a vast amount of people visiting our website each month (over 80,000!), we know it’s not always easy to get information from a screen. And in some cases, having a physical tool can help you do things beyond just educate yourself – you can take notes, track progress, or remind yourself of important tips that can help to improve your bladder health.

That’s why our Resource Center is so important. We have a large variety of downloadable material and tools to help you on your journey to a Life Without Leaks.  Our resources cover a variety of topics, including Overactive Bladder, Bedwetting, Pelvic Organ Prolapse, Urinary Incontinence, and more.  We also have tips sheets for retraining your bladder, information on how to do kegels, bladder and bowel diaries, and a host of other tools available to you.

Check out the below materials in the NAFC Resource Center, and explore the entire library of offerings. 

NAFC DOWNLOADABLE RESOURCES:

 

It's Time To Talk - Visiting Your Doctor To Talk About Bedwetting

 
 
 
 

Have some other resources you’d like to see on nafc.org? Send us a message. We’d love to hear your suggestions!

Behavioral Therapies For Reducing Nocturia

Behavioral Therapies For Reducing Nocturia

Behavioral Therapies For Reducing Nocturia

Nocturia is defined as needing to get up to use the restroom two or more times at night. It is often a symptom of other medical conditions and becomes more common as we age.  Having to get up and use the restroom that often in the middle of the night can be an especially challenging condition for a caregiver to deal with, as it disrupts not only their loved one’s sleep, but theirs as well.  

Here are a few tips to help manage the symptoms:

  • Just before going to bed, urinate and then double-void, relaxing so as to empty your bladder as much as possible
  • Restrict fluid intake: No fluids the last three hours before retiring to bed
  • Eliminate alcohol and caffeine, especially the last three hours before retiring to bed
  • Take a late afternoon rest, lying down for an hour and elevating your legs on a pillow so that heels are higher than your chest, at least two hours before retiring
  • If there is any swelling, or edema, in your feet or ankles, wear compression stockings during the day
  • During the day, consume fruits and vegetables that have natural diuretic properties. A good example is lemon fruit, believed due to its high vitamin C content, according to Purdue University. Others are watermelon, cantaloupe, pears and peaches

The combination of afternoon naps, elevation of legs and compression stockings may reduce fluid build and help alleviate nocturia. In some individuals one of these three options is sufficient in reducing the needed to get up and use the restroom every evening.

As always, consult your physician and understand what treatment options are available. And let us know you’re thoughts in the comments. Nocturia is incredibly common—maybe you have other tips we should consider!  

A Caregivers Guide To Keeping The Bed Dry

A Caregivers Guide To Keeping The Bed Dry

A Caregivers Guide To Keeping The Bed Dry

One of the most challenging things about being a caregiver to someone who has incontinence can be the mornings. Waking up each day to your loved one’s wet bed can be both physically and emotionally draining. No one likes to wash and change sheets each day, and knowing the discomfort (and likely embarrassment) that your loved one feels can be disheartening.  In fact, incontinence is often a big reason that older adults are placed into long-term care facilities.

The key to managing this problem is prevention. Having the right tools at your disposal will do wonders to help keep the bed dry and your loved one comfortable.  And remember, layers are your friend. They will help keep any leaks to a minimum and make clean up so much easier.

Here are some of our top tricks for keeping the bed dry and making your life a little easier.

  1. Zippered, Vinyl Waterproof Mattress Cover. This should go on the bed first and will help keep any moisture from getting on the mattress. After all, replacing a mattress is expensive, and getting lingering odors out of them is very hard. If you do nothing else, do this.
  2. Waterproof Mattress Pad. Use this as a second layer – it’s a softer, but still waterproof cover that will go over your vinyl cover.
  3. Waterproof Flat Sheet.  
  4.  Waterproof Underpad. You can use these both under, and on top of a flat sheet if you wish, and they can be disposable or washable. We recommend putting a large, sturdy, washable pad on the flat sheet, then topping that with a disposable pad that you can simply toss in the trash when needed.
  5. Use Layers Of Blankets Instead Of A Thick Comforter. These are easier to wash in the event of an accident.
  6. Disposable Absorbent Products. A good fitting disposable absorbent product is key. Find one for nighttime use (they’re more absorbent) and make sure the fit is good – you don’t want anything too tight or too lose, as it will lead to leaks. For a breakdown on what to look for, see our guide on absorbent products here.
  7. Skincare Protection. While this won’t protect your bedding, it will protect your loved one. Proper skincare protection can help keep skin from getting irritated or chapped due to accidents that happen during the night. 

Try these tips for a drier night, and happier morning. 

What tips do you have for a dry night? Share them with us in the comments below!

Patient Perspective: Why I No Longer Mind Wearing Adult Diapers

Patient Perspective: Why I No Longer Mind Wearing Adult Diapers.

Patient Perspective: Why I No Longer Mind Wearing Adult Diapers.

I’m a 48-year old man, and I wear adult absorbent briefs. Every day, every night. The problem started when I was around 40. I had always had some nighttime bedwetting issues, but they were rare and something I managed for most of my life with waterproof bedding.

But after I turned 40, I noticed I was having more and more frequent episodes at night. I tried wearing absorbent pads, but they still leaked, causing me to have to change my bed sheets almost 4 times a week. Then the problem started happening during the day – I just couldn’t hold it in long enough to make it to the bathroom.

I saw three doctors, and none of them could find a specific diagnosis for me to explain why I was having this problem. I spent at least a year in denial – foregoing protection because I was embarrassed, but running to the bathroom more often than I wanted. I brought extra clothes with me to work and to social functions “just in case”, and soon, started to limit outings as much as I could because I couldn’t face the prospect of having an accident in front of my family and friends.

I finally realized that if I wanted any semblance of a normal life, I needed to use protection. I did my research and tried out several types of absorbent products to find something that worked for me. (Turns out I use absorbent briefs for day and night, although my nighttime briefs are thicker for extra protection.) 

It used to bother me that I had to wear “diapers” but now, I don’t think about it at all. I’d rather know I am protected vs. having an accident in public. If you struggle with bladder leakage, just bite the bullet and find a product that works for you. In the end, you’ll be so relieved to know that “you’re covered”, and most people won’t even know you are wearing extra protection.

Mike W., Pensacola, FL

Want to share your own story? Enter it here! You may remain anonymous and your story may help inspire others dealing with incontinence issues to seek help! 

10 Tips To Control Bedwetting In Children And Adults

10 Tips To Control Bedwetting In Children And Adults

10 Tips To Control Bedwetting In Children And Adults

Bedwetting is a common issue among young children as well as incontinent adolescents and adults. There are many issues that bedwetting can cause, including embarrassment, discomfort and messes. In addition, bedwetting individuals are at risk of damaging their skin by lying in a wet or soiled bed throughout the night. Bedwetting is therefore an issue that must be dealt with properly, rather than accepting it as fact.

With the proper steps, bedwetting occurrences in both children and adult can become less frequent or even stop altogether.

The following 10 tips offer effective ways to stay dry at night.

1. Monitor fluid intake

Although it is important to stay hydrated throughout the day to avoid dehydration, which can irritate the bladder, try to limit fluid intake during the last few hours before bed. This will help ensure that the bladder isn’t working too hard during the night, which can lead to bedwetting.

2. Cut back on caffeine.

Caffeine has been found to increase urine production rate, and it is therefore recommended to decrease intake of caffeinated products including coffee, tea, carbonated drinks, energy drinks and cocoa, especially close to bedtime.

3. Use the bathroom before bed

Before going to bed, empty your bladder fully to help avoid nighttime accidents.

4. Ensure easy access to the bathroom

For many bedwetting individuals, it may be a simple issue of getting to the bathroom in time. This problem is especially likely when dealing with young children, disabled or mature adults, as well as mentally impaired individuals.

The following are several tips to provide safer and easier access to toileting at night:

  • Clear the path between the bed and bathroom to avoid tripping or falling

  • Use night lights to help your loved one easily locate the bathroom

  • Install a raised toilet seat to make it easier for adults with mobility issues to use the bathroom independently

  • Provide a bedside commode, urinal or bedpan to give immediate access to bedridden adults or those with limited mobility

5. Monitor bowel movements

Constipation can get in the way of effective bladder voiding, so monitor bowel movements to ensure that your loved one is not suffering unnecessarily. If constipation or irregularity is suspected, speak to your doctor about the best way to relieve this issue and thus help avoid nighttime overflows.

6. Use a bedwetting alarm

Bedwetting alarms are an effective way of training incontinent children as well as adults who have primary enuresis (bedwetting since childhood).

Do not use bedwetting alarms for adults who wet their beds at night due to any of the following issues:

  • Secondary enuresis caused by a disease or condition

  • Degenerative diseases

  • Inability to sense when the bladder is full

  • Physical difficulties getting to the bathroom

Bedwetting alarms sound on detection of urine during the night, which can successfully train adults and children to associate the sensation of a full bladder with getting up to use the bathroom. This method has been proven very effective if used consistently for several weeks.

7. Wearable protection

Until your loved one is trained or cured of their bedwetting issues, you can help keep their skin and their beds comfortably dry throughout the night with wearable protection such as incontinence pads, youth or adult diapers and absorbent underwear, also known as pull-ups. Disposable incontinence products – especially those designed for overnight use – can contain a high amount of liquid and are easily disposed of when soiled.

8. Bedding protection

When wearable protection isn’t sufficient for keeping the linen dry during the night, bed pads can go a long way to protect the part of the bed most likely to get wet or soiled. Purchase cost-efficient and environment-friendly reusable underpads or conveniently disposable bed chucks that offer reliable absorbency and waterproof backing to minimize clean-up after an accident.

9. Mattress protection

Mattress covers and mattress pads won’t keep the bedding dry, but it will protect your mattresses from liquid damage and is an important step to consider if your loved one has bedwetting issues. These products are waterproof and usually easy to wash, and offer reliable protection that will allow for longer mattress life. Keep in mind that although thicker mattress pads do provide better comfort for the user, the thickness also means that washing and drying these pads will take longer.

10. Speak to your doctor

Although bedwetting may be uncomfortable or even embarrassing to discuss, it is important to consult your doctor about your issue. This is crucial because a medical professional can help discover the underlying cause of bedwetting issues, which will make treatment easier and more effective.

Bedwetting can be difficult and frustrating for any caregiver, but it is important to remember the feelings of the incontinent individual as well. Always avoid teasing, blaming and punishing loved ones who suffer from bedwetting issues. Not only will this approach be ineffective, since the problem is out of the child or adult’s control; this may actually make the problem worse. Instead, focus on encouraging and supporting your loved one through this difficult time, and with the help of the above tips, you will be well on the way to dry, stress-free nights becoming the new normal.

About The Author: Hanna Landman lives in New Jersey with her husband and child. She works for AvaCare Medical, an online medical supply store servicing seniors and the homebound across the US. She specializes in adult incontinence solutions and writes for their blog on all topics related to incontinence, caregiving, senior living and more.

Bedwetting In Teens - Possible Causes And What To Do About It

Bedwetting In Teens - Possible Causes And What To Do About It.

Bedwetting In Teens - Possible Causes And What To Do About It.

Do you have a teen who is still wetting the bed? You’re not alone. Many teens struggle with nocturnal enuresis, a fancy term for nighttime bedwetting. And while it can be frustrating and emotionally draining for both you, and your teen, most of the time, they will grow out of it.

There are several reasons a teenager may be struggling with staying dry at night:

  • They have a small bladder.
  • They are deep sleepers.
  • They are constipated.
  • There is a family history of bedwetting.
  • They produce too much urine overnight
  • They are experiencing a stressful situation or a big change (new school, change in family dynamic, trouble with friends, etc.)

All of these things may contribute to a teens bedwetting problem.  So, what can you do to help them?  The first course of action is to contact a physician as soon as you can to help set up a treatment plan.  Be supportive of your teen and try not to make a big deal out of it – it’s very likely that your teen is already extremely embarrassed about wetting the bed. Talk with them about it, and show them how to clean themselves, and their bedding when they have an accident. You don’t want to encourage them to hide their problem, but constantly having to ask you for help may make them feel even more embarrassed. 

Below are options to consider if your teenager is still wetting the bed.

Try a bedwetting alarm.

These alarms detect moisture and can alert a teen if they are starting to have an accident. Over time, this can help condition them to wake up and use the bathroom when they need to go.

Bladder retraining.

Just like other muscles in the body, the bladder can be trained to empty at specific times. Learn more about how to retrain your bladder here. 

Medications.

There are several medications that can help with bedwetting in teens and adults. Talk to your doctor to see if this may be a good option for your teen.

Limit fluids before bedtime.

Try to avoid drinking too much about an hour before bedtime, and always be sure to empty your bladder prior to going to bed.

Try the NAFC Dry Night Solution Kit.

Sometimes, the right protection can make all the difference. NAFC's Bedwetting kit allows you to try out several products at a very low price, making it a great way to find out what works for you. Learn more here.

Patient Perspective - Teen Bedwetting

Patient Perspective - Teen Bedwetting

Patient Perspective - Teen Bedwetting

I’m sharing this story as an adult, but it is really about my childhood. I suffered from bedwetting when I was young and it lasted until I was almost a teenager.  I was lucky enough to have very supportive parents, but that didn’t stop the shame I felt every time it happened. It never felt like a big deal until I was around 7. Then I started getting invited to sleep overs, which were always very stressful for me. I was constantly scared of wetting the bed at someone else’s house and of my friends learning my secret. I started to turn down invitations simply because of my fear, and the problem began to effect me emotionally. Luckily, my bedwetting slowed down a lot after I was around 9, but I still had an occasional accident through age 12.

I’m not sure what I would have done I hadn’t had such wonderful parents to help me through it. They never made me feel bad about it, and always were as discreet as possible when helping me clean up after an accident. Their support took a lot of the pressure off of me, which I think would have only added to my problem back then. I now have a 3-year old myself, and, knowing that they could possibly experience prolonged bedwetting (after all – it is hereditary) shows me how stressful it can be for a parent. If you are a parent of a young child reading this, please take this one thing away:  Support your child, even if their problem has caused you countless sleepless nights, extra loads of laundry, and profound frustrations. I can tell you first-hand that it likely pales in comparison to the shame they’ve felt themselves. And the support and understanding you can give to them during this time will do wonders for their self-esteem and sense of wellbeing. They will remember it forever – I know I have.

Terry B., Salt Lake City, Utah

Need a solution for nighttime bedwetting? Try NAFC's Bedwetting Kit, available here.

Bedwetting In Children - Tips For Managing And Overcoming

Tips for managing and overcoming bedwetting in children

Tips for managing and overcoming bedwetting in children

Many parents often cheer once they’ve successfully trained their child to stay dry during the day – and rightfully so! This is a big accomplishment for both you, and your little one! But it can be frustrating for parents when their child is still unable to stay dry at night. It’s important to note that this is not your child’s fault – the functions that a child needs to stay dry at night take a bit longer to develop, and every child develops them at their own pace. Think of it as Potty Training – Round 2.  Parents should work with their children and support them in this sometimes-difficult next step of potty training.

Here are 5 things to remember when working with your child to stay dry through the night: 

It’s Not Their Fault. 

Wetting the bed is a common condition, and it’s in no way your child’s fault.  For a child to stay dry at night, several things need to happen, all of which are really out of their control. The signals between the brain and the bladder need time to fully develop. Their bladder capacity needs to be large enough to hold urine for the entire night. Finally, they need to be able to wake up when the urge to urinate strikes. All of these things take time to develop. Remember – bedwetting is normal in children up to 5 years of age, and is still quite common in children from 5-10 years old.

Don’t blame your child and encourage them when they do well. 

No child wants to wet the bed, and as we just discussed, they truly cannot help doing it.  Don’t make your child feel ashamed or guilty for wetting the bed as this may only prolong the problem. Instead, talk to them about how this problem is normal for kids their age, don’t make a big deal of it if they wet the bed, and offer plenty of praise and reward if they wake up dry.

Empty their bladder before bed. 

Always take your child to the bathroom before bed. You may even want to take your child to the bathroom once more when you yourself go to bed just to see if they can go one more time before a full nights sleep.  Limiting fluids an hour or so before bed can also help keep their bladder empty before a long night.

Talk to their doctor.

Talk to your pediatrician and rule out any potential medical causes that may be keeping your child from staying dry at night. Constipation, which can press on the bladder and reduce bladder capacity, is a common culprit. Other medical conditions, such as UTIs, diabetes, sleep apnea, and even stress can all contribute to bedwetting.

Try a bedwetting alarm.

A bedwetting alarm senses moisture and then alerts the child – through an actual alarm, or through a vibrating sensor. There are several different types that make it easy to choose one that works best for your child, and they can help condition your child to wake up when they feel like they need to empty their bladder. 

Take protective measures.

Make it as easy as possible to clean up any accidents when they happen. Use a waterproof mattress to protect the bed. Have an extra set of pajamas ready to change into just in case.  Put a waterproof pad down on top of the sheets, which is easy to switch out if an accident happens. And don’t be afraid to use pullups if you need to.

Remember, it is completely normal for a child to experience bedwetting accidents – even up to 10 years of age. But rest assured that the majority of children will grow out of this phase. Being supportive and encouraging their successes will help make the process much easier for both you, and your child.

Incontinence and Autism - A Treatment Guide

Incontinence and Autism
Incontinence and Autism

Incontinence is a condition that affects over 35 million Americans of all ages.  Dealing with incontinence can be difficult at any age, but helping a child with a disability, like autism, learn to manage incontinence can be especially challenging. 

As a child, learning to use the bathroom is a normal part of development. And even in children who don’t have a physical, mental or emotional disability, the rate at which they develop this skill varies greatly.  However, for some children with autism, other factors can play a part in how they learn to use the toilet.  Autism is a spectrum disorder brought on by a dysfunction of the central nervous system. It is usually diagnosed in the first three years of life. Children with autism experience impairment of common social skills (making eye contact, interacting with other people or reading social cues), communication difficulties (delayed language development or complete lack of speech), and behavioral challenges (sterotyped and repetitive body movements, extreme attachment to routines, unusually intense or focused interests, and sensory sensitivities to environments including sounds, light, smells and textures.

When looking at these characteristics of autism, it’s easy to understand how some children with autism may have challenges when potty training or learning to remain continent.

Using The 5 Ps.

 Incontinence may come in many forms, but there are some common ways to approach the situation. We call them ‘The 5 Ps,’ and they can help make treatment more tolerable for caregivers and contribute to a real opportunity for improvement:

Patience  

We all know that patience is a virtue, but when it comes to incontinence, it’s often a virtue that’s hard to find. Try not to place blame for setbacks. Instead, provide positive encouragement and do your best to maintain a good sense of humor – it’ll pay off in so many ways.

Persistence

Progress may be slow, but don’t give up. Having a positive outlook and setting sensible goals can reduce frustration for everyone.

Planning  

Incontinence is all about surprises, and they’re usually not pleasant ones! Take the time to schedule activities – even simple ones that you do around the house – and make sure to stick to that schedule. Communications planning is just as important – make sure that teachers, caregivers and anyone else who shares responsibility for the child knows what they need to know about the child’s situation and is able to take appropriate action if needed.

Practice

You never know what will work until you’ve tried it – and in most cases, that means trying and trying again. Test out different treatments, ask healthcare professionals for recommendations and see for yourself if there are certain products or programs that work for you.

Progress Is Possible

It may not always feel like you’re getting somewhere, but there are thousands and thousands of families who can tell you firsthand that the effort you make today really can turn into results down the road. It may not always be realistic to expect a cure, but there are things you can do – tactics, treatments and products – that can make your loved one much more comfortable and your life much easier.

It’s important to note that many children with autism have no problems with incontinence, and for those that do the severity of their condition can vary greatly. In addition, many children continue to develop over time and can improve their condition with the proper help and instruction from a caregiver. 

For more help on addressing incontinence in children with disabilities, download our brochure, Incontinence Support For Children With Disabilities.

Adult Bedwetting: Stories And Tips From Real People

Adult Bedwetting: Stories And Tips From Real People

Adult bedwetting. It’s a rarely talked about condition, but is one that affects many people.  In fact, NAFC receives more visits to the adult bedwetting pages than any other page on our site.  People struggle with this condition for all sorts of reasons – spinal cord injuries, neurological diseases, and even stress can cause bedwetting.  And sometimes there can be seemingly no cause at all, which makes it all the more frustrating to address. Most people who wet the bed are desperate for a solution.  They find it deeply embarrassing, and it greatly affects their quality of life, as they are constantly dealing with keeping things clean and worried about how it will affect current or future relationships.

The good news is there are ways to manage it.  We asked people who live with adult bedwetting to share their best tips and stories with us. And now, we’re sharing them with you.  If you’re longing to wake up dry in the morning, keep reading!

Don’t be afraid to talk to your doctor! 

“Don’t believe everything you read on the Internet. I have been wearing continence products for over a decade now – disposable underwear during the day, and fitted briefs at night. I’ve never had a Dr., RN, or Tech gasp in terror that one of their patients is wearing an incontinence garment, I’ve never had them ask to change me, mock me, or announce my issues to a crowded room.  Doctors are professionals, and they see incontinent people all the time. If you are having incontinence issues, you definitely need to see a Doctor, but don’t be nervous about it. If incontinence was that uncommon, they wouldn’t have aisles dedicated to it in every big box store across the US.”

If your doctor isn’t addressing your needs, find a new one!

“My first Urologist really wanted to focus on medication. I was all for that if it would make my problem go away, but it didn't and it had undesirable side effects. When the medication didn't work the Urologist referred me to a physical therapist and a psychologist, convinced my continence issues were the result of depression. They weren't, and that was when I opted to go with another Urologist. Not every Cop that pulls you over is going to give you a ticket, and not every Doctor is going to focus on what works for you. My second Doctor was focused on how it affected me and how to manage it, and it proved to be a more fruitful relationship. I also think RNs are great to talk to. The Dr. is supposed to be the expert, but in my experience Nurses tend to focus on reality and moving forward. Doctors tend to only focus on cures, even if that isn't a realistic goal.”

Don’t be afraid of adult absorbent products and find one that fits correctly!

“I initially went to what I now see as comical lengths to avoid dealing with my continence issues. I first tried the male guards, which are not designed for nighttime incontinence. When those proved futile I tried buying Goodnites (not designed for a grown man and very ill-fitting), figuring if the store clerk saw me buying bedwetting products designed for juveniles, she would assume that they were for a younger sibling. In retrospect, the clerk at a pharmacy or a grocery store is indifferent to what you buy. I think that is a big thing people initially get hung up on, and they needn’t. I typically buy continence supplies online these days, but no one cares what you are buying as long as you have the cash to pay for it. What is important is buying an incontinence product that works for you and you will use. At night I wear a fitted brief, which is an adult diaper. Initially it was very upsetting, but it gets better with time. Wearing a diaper keeps me dry, my bed dry, my girlfriend dry, and I get a good night’s sleep.  It took me a while to get over the hump of accepting that this was what I had to wear to bed, but eventually I got over it. Now it is just a thing I do at night, no different than brushing my teeth and flossing.”

“The best thing to do is accept that you have the condition and take steps to manage it. Look into products like mattress protectors, bed pads or even diapers. I'm 29 and know how frustrating it is. But I've accepted that diapers are my best option for me. Trust me, taking off a wet diaper in the morning is WAY better than having to change and launder sheets and clothes.” 

Don’t be scared to open up about your condition with your loved ones.

“Everyone is different, but I think that if you are in a relationship with someone and you have an illness or injury, that isn’t going to change things. I was straightforward with my girlfriend and we moved on together. We are still intimate. We still sleep together. We just keep my nighttime attire exclusive of our love life. “

Your attitude can make a huge difference!

“I used to "suffer" with bed wetting but once I became resigned to it, protected myself from its effects with good thick diapers, and changed my attitude about it, the suffering left. For many of us and maybe even you this is simply a condition in life to deal with. Let the suffering go and just accept it as a reality for yourself. You will be much happier and content.”

“I developed continence problems as the result of an unexpected side effect of surgery when I was 14 years old. I'm 74 now. So I've been dealing with these issues for 60 years. I've never been reliably dry at night since then. I was in diapers 24/7 for a couple of years after the surgery, but I managed to develop enough daytime control to go without a diaper except at night by the time I went to university. However, my incontinence increased again when I was in my forties; and I've been in diapers 24/7 since then. Incontinence is just a part of my life, and diapers are the kind of underpants that I wear. I do not "suffer"! I just manage my incontinence as a nuisance that isn't much worse than needing to wear glasses or going bald and not nearly as bad as my arthritis.”

“If your bedwetting is treatable, see the necessary doctors and get it treated. However, if it's chronic and not going to go away, acceptance and management with good diapers are the keys. "Suffering" is optional. I recommend just getting on with your life. Incontinence in general and bedwetting in particular are nuisances that need not ruin your life unless you let them. So don't let them do so.”

Find a support group!

“One of the best things that happened to me happened as a result of the NAFC forum. There was an incontinence panel put together, where individuals were part of a focus group and discussed how incontinence affected their life. I appreciate forums like this because you can discuss issues with other people facing them, but in the real world I always keep my private life private. That focus group meant a lot to me because I had a chance to talk with other people (even just on the phone) that had the same problem and the same concerns. I realized then that everyone worries about people noticing. Everyone worries about odor and stigma. And everyone (at least in the group) wears some sort of protection. That was actually a big weight of my chest being able to talk to people about it that were outside my extended family and the medical field, and if the opportunity presents itself again I highly encourage people to participate. The first 10 minutes are a little awkward, but after that people open up and you realize you aren't alone.” 


Finding An Absorbent Product That Works!

Finding An Absorbent Product That Works

Anyone who has shopped for absorbent products knows that it’s no walk in the park. Walk down any of these isles in Walmart, Target or Walgreens and you’ll find hundreds of products designed to keep you dry.  How do you find the right one for you, and what should be considered when choosing an absorbent product?

The three biggest things you should look at when choosing a product are absorbency, comfort, and fit. 

If you don’t have all of these things, you’re not going to have a product that works for your needs.

Absorbency. 

When looking at absorbency, make sure you look for products that wick moisture away from the body and those that have cloth-like outer layers for the quietest product available. Specifically select products designed for urinary incontinence because they have super absorbent gels that absorb urine and expand by as much as 20 times for maximum absorbency.  Think about the type of incontinence you are experiencing and then investigate your options – do you experience only occasional leaks, or is it more than that? Do you have nighttime incontinence or do you usually only leak during the day? There are products designed specifically for all of these scenarios so pay attention to the different categories.

Fit. 

This is probably the most important thing to pay attention to, and can be the hardest to get right.  Look for a size that accommodates your body type and is not too big or too small.  Otherwise, there can be waste, misfit, and potential leakage.  Just like clothing, different brands may fit you better than others – we’re all unique, after all – so don’t be afraid to try out various brands, or different product lines within a specific brand.

Comfort. 

Finding a product that you feel good in can boost your confidence. Think about your lifestyle when choosing a product – are you very active? Do you travel? Do you like to wear certain types of clothing (like skinny jeans) that may necessitate a specific type of product? Do you want to reuse the product or just dispose of it when you are finished wearing it?  Keeping these things in mind will help you when narrowing down the types of products you look at.

It may take several tries to find the right product, but don’t give up.  Once you find something you’re comfortable with, you’ll be secure in knowing that you can get back to your life without fear of leaking.  And if you’re too embarrassed to visit a retail store, there are many online retailers that will deliver product straight to your home. 

For a complete list of all the different types of absorbent products available, click here.  And if you are struggling to find a product that works for nighttime bedwetting, our new Dry Night Solution Kit may be just what you need.  You'll get the chance to speak about your condition and needs with a trained professional and receive custom samples of absorbent and skincare products to try out, all delivered straight to you. You'll also receive some great education on bedwetting and learn new things you can do to manage it. Get your kit today!

 
 

Think Bedwetting Is A Children's Issue? Think Again. Bedwetting In Adults Is More Common Than You Realize.

Bedwetting In adults is very prevalent

We’ve been talking about adult bedwetting this month, a condition that affects over 5,000,000 people in the United States.  For those who don’t deal with this situation nightly, it may seem not seem to be a big deal, but for the millions that pray every night to wake up dry, it can be a source of constant worry, frustration, and embarrassment.  

NAFC recently conducted an online survey in an effort to better understand the types of things adults who struggle with bedwetting go through. In just one month, we received a total of over 600 responses from both patients and caregivers detailing the specifics of their bedwetting, what they do to manage it, and the extent to which the condition affects them.  

What we heard was very surprising.

The age range of those experiencing bedwetting varied greatly, but surprisingly, the majority of respondents were neither very young or old – falling within the ages of 18-44.   And while 1/3 had only been suffering for a few months, over half of our respondents had been dealing with bedwetting for 2 years or more.  

And yet, even though many struggle with this condition for years, over 60% had never talked to their doctor about the problem, and 71% have not been diagnosed with an incontinence condition.

However, the lack of diagnosis does not mean that this condition does not bother them.  Most people who visited NAFC.org came because bedwetting was affecting their quality of life, and their personal relationships.  They are frustrated, and are looking for treatments to their bedwetting.  And, when asked what the biggest challenge is, “Embarrassment” topped the list, which explains why many likely do not seek treatment from a professional.  In fact, embarrassment is such a big factor with adult bedwetting, that it prevents not only lifestyle – like visiting or hanging out with friends, and productivity at work - but in several cases, it even prevents people from  making major life decisions, like getting married, because they are too afraid of someone else finding out about their condition.

For Caregivers, keeping things clean and getting their loved one to talk about their bedwetting problem was the biggest challenge.  Many people who wet the bed do not want to address the issue – again, because they are embarrassed, and are afraid of how their loved one will view them.

Finding the best products to deal with leaks is your best defense against bedwetting. There are many online retailers that can help you with this. The benefits of using an online supplier are many: you can order everything from the comfort of your own home, your packages arrive discreetly at your door, and best of all, you can typically consult with a representative on the phone who can walk you through a series of questions to learn more about your specific needs and suggest a product that will work best for you. Those who have had trouble finding a product that fits and works well with their lifestyle will realize what an amazing benefit this is.

Learn more about online retailers here!

Announcing NAFC's New Dry Night Solution Kit: A Treatment Option For Adult Bedwetters

We are thrilled to announce a new offering from NAFC, in partnership with HDIS, for the many adults who struggle with bedwetting.

Over 5,000,000 American adults of all ages experience bedwetting.  This problem can be isolating and embarrassing, and can lead to many frustrated mornings.  Many people with this condition keep it a secret, and struggle with finding the right products or solutions to help them. Fortunately, there’s no reason why anyone should have to wake up wet.  

The new NAFC Dry Night Solution Kit provides education and customized products to fit your specific needs.  When you sign up to get your kit, you’ll get immediate access to educational brochures chock full of great info on what causes bedwetting and what you can do about it.  You’ll also receive a number to call, where you’ll have the chance to speak with a qualified professional who will assemble a custom kit full of products that will help you wake up dry.  

Kits are available for a limited time.  To learn more about the kit, and to order yours, click here.  You’ll then receive an email with access to digital bedwetting brochures, and a phone number and promotion code to use to get your Dry Night Solution Kit.  

Order your kit today!  

All I Want For Christmas Is A Dry Bed

My Story: Living With Bedwetting

My name is Sandy, and I wet the bed.  Not every night, but at least twice a week.  Sometimes, the effect is minimal – just a small leak in my underwear as I’m racing to make it to the restroom.  Other times though, well, let’s just say I’ve started sleeping on a waterproof pad at night.

Bedwetting as an adult is one of the most embarrassing things I have gone through.  I didn’t always suffer from this problem, but a weakened pelvic floor seems to be my “gift” after birthing 2 kids.  My husband is very supportive, but I can tell that it bothers him, too.  The constant laundering of bedclothes, waking up occasionally to wetness – it takes its toll emotionally, physically, and financially.  Not only do we both lose sleep on these nights, we have spent a small fortune trying to manage the condition.  Waterproof pads, disposable adult diapers and absorbent products, bedwetting alarms – we’ve tried them all and while they all have their varying degrees of success, it doesn’t really cure the problem.  I still wet the bed.

And yet, even as bedwetting has cost me sleep, money, and my dignity, I have waited years to see a doctor.  I guess I’ve just always felt it was embarrassing enough to share it with my husband, let alone someone I don’t really know very well.  So I lived in a silent hell for the past few years, often trying to hide it from my husband as much as I am able to, and praying each night that it will be a dry one. 

But I’m through with wishing and hoping.  I finally summoned the courage to make an appointment with a urologist to talk about this problem, and guess what…..HE WAS NOT PHASED IN THE LEAST!  He told me that he sees patients like me all the time and there are actually many options available to bedwetters, depending on the cause of their condition.  Telling him was a huge weight off my shoulders too – finally sharing this with someone else and having them understand, plus hearing that there are others like me was a big relief.  And, for once I have hope that there may be something that I can do to get my condition under control, which is truly empowering.

While he outlined many types of treatments I could try, I’m starting with physical therapy to hopefully regain some of the muscle control that I have lost over the years from childbirth.  And if that doesn’t work, there are medications, and even surgery that may help.  I feel so much more confident now that I have taken action and am on a path to fix my problem.  And while I am definitely not there yet, I am hopeful that the new year will bring what I want most – a dry bed.

Millions of Americans live with adult bedwetting.  It is an embarrassing and sometimes debilitating condition for many.  But there are treatment options available.  Talk to a specialist to learn more about what you can do to treat this issue and get your life back.  Need help finding a specialist near you?  Visit the NAFC Specialist Locator to find one in your area.

Incontinence: Myths VS. Truths

Incontinence Myths Vs. Truths

Incontinence affects millions of people every day— both men and women. Talking about issues like stress urinary incontinence, an enlarged prostate, or adult bedwetting isn’t something people do regularly, so there are a lot of rumors swirling around about how to manage your bladder and bowel health.

We’d like to combat the rumors and get an honest dialogue going. Let us put the myths side by side for you to review.

Myths Vs. Truths of Incontinence

Myth:  If you drink less water, you won’t have to go as often.

Truth:  Drinking enough water every day is crucial to avoiding infections and keeping your body hydrated. Drinking fewer diuretics, like coffee or tea, will help lessen the urge to go.

Myth Always buy one size larger in absorbency products.

Truth It is very important to buy the appropriate size absorbency product to avoid skin rashes, leakage, or bunching under clothes. Learn more about how to find the right type of absorbent product here.

Myth:  Incontinence just happens with old age. It’s normal!

Truth:  Incontinence isn’t necessarily indicative of old age. It’s really indicative of weak pelvic floor muscles.

Myth Going to the bathroom at night isn’t an issue until you have to go more than 3 times.

Truth:  If you go the bathroom two times or more a night regularly, you may have Nocturia. Nocturia is an overproduction of urine at night or an overproduction of urine during the daytime and nighttime.

Myth Accidentally wetting the bed is just a kid’s problem.

Truth While once thought of as something only little kids experienced, studies show that at least 2% of adults lose control of urination during the night. This is bedwetting or Nocturnal Enuresis (NE).

Myth Only women deal with incontinence. What I have is just temporary. Men don’t have problems like this.

Truth Men and women are both privy to bladder and bowel struggles. In fact, as many as 50% of men experience symptoms of an enlarged prostate by the age of 60. An enlarged prostate can interfere with the urethra, the tube inside the penis that carries urine and semen out of the body and create pressure that blocks the natural flow of urine (and semen) causing irritation. If left untreated, this condition can lead to more serious problems. 

Myth:  You don’t need to talk to your doctor about your incontinence. It will go away on its own.

Truth With more than 25 million Americans affected by either bladder control or bowel control issues, the medical community has taken note. And because incontinence is a symptom rather than a disease, the method of treatment depends on diagnostic results. Talk to you doctor to learn more about other areas of your health that may be affecting your bladder or bowel control. Click here to find the right doctor for you.

Did you learn anything new in the comparison above? Share your thoughts in the comment section or share this post to start the conversation on Facebook!