Atlantic Therapeutics Debuts the First FDA-Cleared, Wearable and Non-Invasive Solution for Stress Urinary Incontinence

INNOVO For Stress Urinary Incontinence

 1-IN-3 WOMEN IN AMERICA CAN NOW PROUDLY DECLARE “I JUST FREE’D MYSELF WITH INNOVO THANKS TO REVOLUTIONARY NEW DEVICE TO TREAT ROOT CAUSE OF BLADDER WEAKNESS

Pleasanton, CA (JUNE 5, 2019)“OMG. I just free’d myself!” Today, 20 million women in America will rewrite that whispered, uncomfortable admission of bladder weakness[1] into a declarative, celebratory shout thanks to INNOVO®. As the first-in-class wearable, non-invasive solution for Stress Urinary Incontinence (SUI), INNOVO has the potential to positively impact the lives of one in three women.[2] These women will now be able to laugh louder, exercise harder and even sneeze with ease.

The INNOVO thigh-length, elasticized therapeutic shorts are outfitted with eight electrodes sewn in a crisscross formation across the pelvic region. When activated via its attached hand-held controller, INNOVO delivers a series of pelvic stimulations equivalent to Kegel exercises for strengthening the pelvic floor.

“INNOVO can help women declare freedom from incontinence and independence from pads,” said Dr. Nita Landry, board-certified OB/GYN and co-host of the Emmy® Award-winning television show “The Doctors.”  “These innovative, therapeutic shorts with targeted muscle stimulations empower women to treat the source for a long-term solution, rather than rely on a short-term pad to manage the problem.”

According to the Urology Care Foundation, one in three women suffer from SUI at some point in their life. Of those women, 23 percent report it negatively impacts their sex lives and 31 percent dress differently because of their symptoms.[3] Of the 33 percent of women who experience SUI after childbirth, 65 percent are still affected over the next dozen years.[3] 

What is INNOVO?

INNOVO is the first transcutaneous muscle electrical stimulator cleared by the FDA.2 Utilizing its innovative Multipath™ technology, INNOVO sends targeted and pain-free muscle stimulations through a pair of shorts, via neuromuscular electrical stimulation, to safely and effectively strengthen the muscles in the pelvic floor.  In a study, 80 percent of INNOVO users saw significant improvements after four weeks and 87 percent were defined as ‘dry’ or ‘near dry’ at the end of three months.

“I’ve seen first-hand the everyday shame and pain patients endure with Stress Urinary Incontinence,” said Dr. Ruth Maher, co-inventor of INNOVO, Professor, Department of Physical Therapy Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine – Georgia. “With more than 2.5 million, safe and successful therapy sessions in Europe, I’m proud and happy to finally bring this prescribed treatment to women in America.”

INNOVO can be used in the privacy and comfort of one’s home while either standing, reclining or lying down. The recommended treatment is 30-minutes a day, five days a week, for three months. After the three-month period, it is recommended that INNOVO be used once a week for 30-minutes. In each 30-minute session, INNOVO delivers 180 perfect pelvic floor stimulations (or Kegels).

Turning Stress Urinary Incontinence into I’m Confident

SUI is the term used when leaks accidentally occur after pressure on the bladder from coughing, sneezing, laughing, or exercising. These simple movements put pressure on the bladder and, should the pelvic floor muscles be unable to tighten enough, will cause an involuntary leak. It can happen at any age, however, is most common during pregnancy, post-childbirth [i] and during stages of menopause.

 

The Prescription for a Pad-free Future

INNOVO is available only by a doctor’s prescription for a US retail price of $449.95. Women interested in treating their SUI should visit myinnovo.com for more information. While not covered by insurance, the price is almost a third less than the average $700 per year typically spent on incontinence pads each year.

 

About INNOVO

INNOVO is a first-in-class, wearable and truly non-invasive solution that treats the root cause of SUI or bladder weakness safely.1 Utilizing its innovative technology, INNOVO sends targeted and pain-free muscle stimulations through a pair of shorts, via neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES), to safely and effectively strengthen the muscles in the pelvic floor. 

 

About Atlantic Therapeutics 

Atlantic Therapeutics develops professional and consumer medical devices, related software, apps and connected health technologies to treat all types of incontinence, sexual health dysfunctions, and other associated disorders by strengthening muscles and modulating nerves of the pelvic floor. INNOVO from Atlantic Therapeutics is an FDA cleared, externally applied, patented CE device that delivers a safe, clinically effective and comfortable therapy to treat reversible clinical conditions associated with pelvic floor weakness in the comfort of the user’s own home. Learn more at www.myinnovo.com.

 

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References:

[1] Epidemiology Of Mixed, Stress, and Urgency Urinary Incontinence in Middle-aged/older Women: the Importance Of Incontinence History. Yuko Komesu-Ronald Schrader-Loren Ketai-Rebecca Rogers-Gena Dunivan - https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4957945/

[2] R. Dmochowski – Novel external electrical muscle stimulation device for the treatment of female stress urinary incontinence: randomized controlled noninferiority trial versus intravaginal electrical stimulation. ICS Conference 2018

[3] Urology Care Foundation. What is Stress Urinary Incontinence (SUI)?. https://www.urologyhealth.org/urologic-conditions/stress-urinary-incontinence-(sui). Accessed February 2019.

 

pee when you...laugh, sneeze, cough, workout, have sex….? You’re not alone. Learn about a new option to treat Stress Urinary Incontinence.

Stress Urinary Incontinence Treatment

Stress Urinary Incontinence, the type of incontinence that happens when you exert any type of pressure on your bladder or pelvic floor, happens to millions of American women. The pesky leaks can show up unexpectedly, whether you’re laughing at your best friends joke, or doing a jumping jack in your Tuesday morning workout class.

Peeing your pants something that almost no one wants to admit to. But unfortunately it happens a to a lot of us. And, even worse, many women choose to do nothing about it, chalking it up to a normal part of getting older. 

So let’s set the record straight – bladder leakage is not a right of passage as we age, nor is it something that you should live with. It’s a medical condition that deserves to be treated, because while it might be common, wetting yourself regularly is not normal. 

There are many things that can contribute to SUI. Anytime the pelvic floor is weakened or compromised it can cause the muscles to be a bit lax, making it harder for you to hold in urine.  A common cause is, of course, childbirth – especially if you delivered vaginally.  The mere act of carrying a baby around for nine months and then delivering it can make your muscles weak and even cause some nerve or tissue damage that make you more prone to leaks.

But other things can cause damage too – being overweight puts extra pressure on the pelvic floor, causing it to weaken.  As does having a chronic cough (commonly seen in long-time smokers). And any other type of surgery that may have touched the pelvic floor may make you more susceptible.

Our pelvic floor does also naturally weaken a bit as we age. Most people don’t pay much attention to their pelvic floors, which can cause problems later in life.

The pelvic floor is a muscle, and like any other muscle in the body, it needs to be strengthened in order for it to do its job. If you’ve had damage to the pelvic floor at some point in your life, like during childbirth, you may have already put it in a state of weakness, even if you didn’t immediately have any problems like incontinence.

But without treating it, gravity can continue to weaken the pelvic floor and can lead to things like incontinence, or other types of pelvic floor disorders.

All that being said, it’s important to note that while incontinence may happen more often when we’re older, it can strike anyone at any age. New moms may be just as susceptible to experiencing bladder leaks as someone who gave birth 30 years ago. 

The good news is there are many options to treat it. One of the newest options is a product called INNOVO.

INNOVO

INNOVO: A new product for Stress Urinary Incontinence 

New to the scene is a product from Atlantic Therapeutics called INNOVO.  INNOVO is the first wearable, active and truly non-invasive solution to treat stress urinary incontinence. INNOVO is cleared by the FDA, and provides women a safe, clinically effective solution that treats the root cause, not just the symptoms of bladder weakness.

How it works.

INNOVO’s Multipath technology delivers 180 gentle pulses, strengthening the pelvic floor during each 30-minute session.

The device is cleverly hidden in a pair of easy-to-slip on shorts that deliver 180 pulses to stimulate muscle contraction. INNOVO shorts are comfortable and are made of breathable, skin-friendly material, which come in a range of sizes.

INNOVO is highly effective. It’s been proven to clinically treat SUI when used for 30 minutes a day, five days a week for 12 weeks. In fact, 80% of users found that INNOVO significantly improved their quality of life. After just 4 weeks, 80% of INNOVO users saw significant improvement and after 12 weeks of use, 87% of reported being dry or nearly dry.

The best part? You’re able to use INNOVO in the comfort of your own home.

INNOVO is now available! Talk to your doctor or PT about this innovative new product and learn how you can start using it to address Stress Urinary Incontinence.

Learn more about INNOVO here.

 

 

 

 

 

Patient Perspective: Sally's Story

Sally's Story - Running and working out when you have incontinence

Once both my kids were in elementary school full time, I finally started working out. I became a runner, and devoted most mornings after they were in school to jogging through the neighborhood. I entered races and started doing small 5Ks, until I finally worked my way up to a full marathon last year. Things were going great and I was feeling strong and happy.

So, imagine my surprise, after years of being an avid runner, to suddenly start experiencing bladder leaks. My kids were not little anymore – they were both in high school at this point and I thought that I bypassed this type of problem that usually accompanies childbirth.

I spoke to my doctor, and found out that, to my surprise, this problem often accompanies serious runners too. Turns out that pounding the pavement every day isn’t so great for your pelvic floor. In fact, my doctor told me that up to 30% of female runners experience incontinence while running.

My doctor said there are lots of things that can weaken the pelvic floor over the years; childbirth, age, and surgeries can all take their toll (I unfortunately check all three boxes). Add to that running several miles per week, and I saw how my activity was contributing to the problem. 

I wasn't ready to give up running, and luckily my doctor didn't think I had to. While there are many therapies available (medication, surgery, exercise), he started me on a regimen of kegel exercises. I do them first thing in the morning, and 3 other times throughout the day.  He also recommended that I try some other behavioral tactics: limit my fluid intake right before my run, make sure to empty my bladder before running, and try planning a route that has some bathroom stops along the way. 

These changes have been helping me a lot and while there might come a time that I consider something like surgery, for now, it helps to know that I’m able to take matters into my own hands and manage my bladder leaks without stopping the activities I love. 

I'm glad I opened up about this condition and can continue my passion!

Sally S., Atlanta, GA

Patient Perspective: Merrell's Story

Patient Perspective: Merrell's Story, new mom, stress urinary incontinence

I gave birth to my first little bundle of joy a year ago.  My pregnancy was a dream – no morning sickness, no stretch marks - it was a total breeze, apart from the occasional leaks I had leading up to the birth. I had heard leaks were totally normal though, and figured that after baby came, everything would go back to the way it was before, so I didn’t really give them much thought.

After my baby was born, things changed dramatically. Suddenly, I was dealing with breastfeeding problems, sleepless nights, and a fussy baby that needed me 24-7. Not to mention those little leaks that I had before baby came - they were still lingering and I found myself changing my own pants almost as often as I was changing my baby. Every sneeze, laugh, and jump, caused me to leak and it really started to get me down. After all, I was in the middle of learning a new job – the most important job of my life, being a mom – and I couldn’t even get my own body to behave appropriately.

I finally talked to my doctor about it and he recommended physical therapy. I didn’t even know that was an option!  But, turns out that strengthening your core and  your pelvic floor muscles can really help control your bladder. This was great, because I wasn’t prepared to undergo surgery (not recommended if you’re planning on having more kids, like I am), and was really hoping to find a more natural option. So this seemed like a perfect fit for me.

My therapist started by reviewing my anatomy and showing me how all my muscles are connected. She also told me that I had diastasis recti, which is when your stomach muscles separate during pregnancy. This can really weaken your core, which affects your pelvic floor muscles too. She showed me exercises to help bring these muscles back together and strenghten my core. After baby, it’s also important to do your kegels to help get your strength back – my therapist told me that this would help me control those little leaks that I had when I placed stress on my bladder (like when I coughed, sneezed, or laughed).

It’s been 6 months since I started physical therapy and I’m happy to say that I’m leak free! I feel stronger and more in control of my body, and, more importantly, I feel better able to focus on and care for my growing baby.

I’m so happy I sought help. It makes me feel empowered, and better prepared to handle future pregnancies and babies.

New moms – don’t keep quite about this. Talk to your doctor and get help. There’s no need to suffer in silence. 

Merrell N., Austin, TX

Bladder Health and Sex

Bladder Health and Sex

Understanding what is normal during sex and what is unusual can be challenging. After all, sex is a very private experience and differs for every person. Generally speaking, there is no reason for your bladder to empty during sex or for you to feel extreme discomfort or experience pain during sex.

As you can guess, the health of your bladder can directly affect your sex life. 

Two common reasons individuals experience pain or discomfort with their bladder during or after sex are: bladder pain syndrome and stress urinary incontinence.

Interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome (IC/BPS)

Bladder pain syndrome is the continual sensation of pressure or pain on the bladder. This syndrome typically affects women and leaves individuals feeling as if they have to urinate when they don’t have any urine to pass.

Consider making dietary changes and practicing bladder retraining so your bladder begins to hold more urine before experiencing the urge to go.

Relax before engaging in sex to ensure as little stress as possible. Stress can cause flare-ups and trigger discomfort.

Stress Urinary Incontinence

Stress Urinary Incontinence or SUI occurs because of weak pelvic floor muscles and/or a deficient urethral sphincter. This weakness can cause the bladder to leak during exercise, coughing, sneezing, laughing, or any body movement that puts pressure on the bladder. If sex is particular jarring, SUI can be affected.

Consider exercises to strengthen your pelvic floor and limit caffeine intake. Always empty your bladder before sex.

We hope this peek into how your bladder health can impact sex was helpful. If you have experienced any of the symptoms noted above and haven’t talked to your doctor, it’s time to schedule an appointment. Additionally, we feel it’s important to share your health with your partner if you continue to have sex while experiencing some of these bladder health concerns.

Join us on our forum to talk more and learn how others have dealt with issues like these.