NAFC's Top 8 Tips For Caregivers

Top 8 Tips For Caregivers

Top 8 Tips For Caregivers

Being a caregiver to someone you love is complicated work – it can be both rewarding, and draining all at once. The emotional and physical demands placed on a caregiver are many. Add to that the financial strain that many caregivers face and it’s easy to see how caregivers can become a bit stressed out at times.

Read below to learn our Top 8 Tips for Caregivers.

Learn To Take Care Of Yourself First.

Before you can even begin to care for someone else, you need to ensure that your own needs are met. Eating well, getting good sleep, and exercising regularly will help you stay healthy and energized. And don’t forget about taking regular breaks and time outs for yourself – it may seem like an extravagance, but fitting in a little alone time can do wonders for your mood.  You’ll come back feeling refreshed and ready to take on the daily demands of caregiving.

Get Organized.

Medical files, legal documents, financial information – who knew that caregiving would involve so much paperwork! Get organized right from the start and create a system that will allow you to keep track of all your important records.  Also, speak with your loved one and make sure that you know their wishes for end of life care and make sure you get any paperwork needed in order.

Get The Help You Need.

There are lots of services out there that can help you manage the load of caregiving. Finding extra medical support, meal assistance, or even having a friend or family member help out for a few hours each week can help shoulder a lot of the burden of caregiving.

Simplify Your Own Life.

Taking care of someone else can make your other daily chores seem harder. Outsource what you can and automate everything else. Hire a cleaning person. Sign up for a food service like Blue Apron. Have your groceries delivered or set up an auto grocery list online for things that you purchase regularly. Set up automatic bill pay for your fixed expenses. Simplifying these things can help free up some of your precious time and energy, and help keep you from becoming overwhelmed.

Connect With Others.

Things are always easier when you have someone else to talk to. Sign up for one of the many online networks available to caregivers and chat with others who understand. You may even be able to find a local support group in your area. Here are some great networks to check out:

Find Ways To Connect With Your Loved One Daily.

With all the routine demands of caregiving – bathing, feeding, managing medications – it can be easy to forget one of the most important things an aging loved one needs – human connection. Don’t get so caught up in the daily demands that you forget to spend quality time with your loved one. Taking daily walks, reading or listening to audio books, playing card games, looking through old pictures or even just watching a favorite television show together can help make your loved one feel loved and connected. And telling them how much you love them will never get old.

Learn About Your Loved One’s Condition.

Learn as much as you can about any conditions that your loved one may be dealing with. Knowing what to expect and how to handle it can make a world of difference.

Put Yourself In Their Shoes.

Caregiving can sometimes be a thankless job, and it’s easy to see how frustrations can morph into feelings of bitterness or resentment toward your loved one. But the saying “Treat others how you would like to be treated” applies in this situation as well.  Think about how you would like to be cared for and try your best to understand your loved ones feelings and what they are going through.

When Going Gets Tough, The Tough Become Incontinent

Incontinence in Men Due To Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH)

This is the first in a 3-part series on urinary incontinence in men suffering with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Dr. Richard Roach, of Advanced Urology in Oxford, FL, discusses disease state, symptoms and treatments.

Bearing in mind the fantastic wealth of resources available on the National Association for Continence BHEALTH blog, I thought I would take the opportunity to focus on a somewhat lesser known facet of continence: the unique link between urinary retention and incontinence in men with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH).

The classic male patient with BPH often experiences both filling and emptying symptoms. These could manifest themselves in the form of frequency, urgency or weak stream, among others. Patients with BPH will often tell me they feel like they have to go all the time, but can’t seem to go when they stand at the urinal. It’s a perplexing (and frustrating) feeling.

So why am I contributing to a continence blog writing about a population of men who can’t pee? In short, these men often experience stress and overflow incontinence.

It’s counterintuitive, but when you give it some thought, it makes sense.

BPH causes the prostate to enlarge. This growth can cause narrowing of the prostatic urethra, which makes the process of urination more difficult. All the while, the bladder must work harder to overcome the resistance from the obstruction in the urethra. If left untreated, the bladder’s muscular lining will thicken, causing it to weaken and become less efficient at draining – in some cases irrevocably. 

It’s usually at this juncture that symptoms become severe. Men suffer from incomplete emptying, even after using the restroom, and always have the feeling of being “full.” Their frequent trips to the restroom at night cause sleep cycle interruptions. With the bladder stretched, sneezing, laughing or coughing can cause leakage, or in more extreme cases the bladder may leak because it’s simply too full.

If they haven’t found a urologist by this point, usually we find them … recovering in the hospital from acute urinary retention. In this setting, the most immediate relief comes in the form of catheterization, either from an indwelling or intermittent catheter. Usually, the patient’s bladder health and overall physiology dictate whether a de-obstructive procedure to remove prostate tissue will provide more permanent relief.

For a smaller percentage of men, particularly those who have aversions to the risk of surgery, or more commonly, health complications that prevent a surgical de-obstructive procedure, catheterization is the only solution. Yet chronic catheterization comes with several important drawbacks, including:

  1.    Losing the ability to void naturally
  2.    Heightened infection risk
  3.    Compromises to quality of life

In the next post on this topic, we’ll delve into these three issues in more detail, as we take a closer look at urinary catheters. Part 3 of this series will also cover the amazing story of a patient who was brought back from the brink after years of struggling with chronic catheterization for BPH symptoms. But first, let me add a few closing thoughts on the theme of BPH-induced incontinence.

I can’t stress enough how important it is to get regular screenings for bladder and prostate health. Checkups like these should be likened to that of mammograms or stress tests. Furthermore, males experiencing the symptoms above should seek medical guidance from a urologist as early as possible, preferably well before incontinence becomes a focal point of symptoms.

Read Part 2 of this series here.

 
Dr. Richard Roach attended the University of Wisconsin-Madison Medical School and completed his residency at the University of Wisconsin-Madison Hospital and Clinics. After graduation, Dr. Roach moved to Minocqua, Wisconsin and joined the Marshfield Clinic, where he practiced for the next 26 years. In 2013, he moved to Florida and is currently a partner in Advanced Urology Institute. He is certified by the American Board of Urology. His specialties include plasma vaporization for BPH, treatment of female stress incontinence and penile prosthesis for ED. He is also an expert in laser & laparoscopic surgery.
Dr. Richard Roach attended the University of Wisconsin-Madison Medical School and completed his residency at the University of Wisconsin-Madison Hospital and Clinics. After graduation, Dr. Roach moved to Minocqua, Wisconsin and joined the Marshfield Clinic, where he practiced for the next 26 years. In 2013, he moved to Florida and is currently a partner in Advanced Urology Institute. He is certified by the American Board of Urology. His specialties include plasma vaporization for BPH, treatment of female stress incontinence and penile prosthesis for ED. He is also an expert in laser & laparoscopic surgery.