Can MS Cause Incontinence?

Can MS Cause Incontinence?

March is Multiple Sclerosis Awareness Month here in the US and we’re taking a moment to talk about MS and it’s effect on the bladder and bowel.

What is Multiple Sclerosis?

Multiple Sclerosis (MS) happens when the body’s immune system attacks the protective coating around the nerve fibers in the central nervous system (CNS), damaging the nerves. This alters or stops the messages within the CNS and can produce a variety of symptoms in people.

What are the symptoms of MS?  

While symptoms of MS vary from person to person, and even within the same person at different points throughout their lifetime, some of the more common symptoms of MS are fatigue, pain, numbness or tingling, weakness, walking difficulty, vision problems, sexual problems, dizziness and vertigo, bladder and bowel problems, thinking difficulty, emotional changes and depression.1  Luckily, many of these symptoms are treatable with medication.

How does MS affect bladder function?

In a healthy bladder, the nerves in the bladder communicate through the spinal cord to the brain, notifying it that the bladder needs to be emptied. For this process to work smoothly, it requires a coordination between the bladder muscles and the sphincter.

For people with MS, bladder function can be impaired when the signal from the bladder to the brain is delayed or blocked. This can cause the bladder to be either overactive (often referred to as a “spastic” bladder), or under-active, resulting in the inability to empty the bladder completely.  Either of these conditions can lead to a variety of problems, including:

  • Urinary Urgency (The need to urinate frequently and urgently.)

  • Nocturia (Needing to wake to use the bathroom more than one time per night.)

  • Difficulty urinating.

  • Sphincter Dyssynergia A problem where there is both a storage dysfunction and an emptying dysfunction. The bladder is trying to contract and empty, and the urethra contracts instead of relaxing, allowing little or no urine to pass.

  • Under-active Bladder: The nerve signals from the bladder to the brain are damaged and the signal for the bladder to contract and release urine are blocked. This can cause the bladder to eventually overflow and leak urine, or, if the bladder cannot empty completely, results in urinary retention.

In addition to disease related complications, some medications for MS can also cause bladder problems.

How can bladder problems with MS be treated?

Luckily, there are various treatment options that can be used to address bladder problems associated with multiple sclerosis. 

Behavioral modifications, such as avoiding bladder irritating foods and drinks, and bladder retraining can help to manage problems in some people. Pelvic floor physical therapy can also work by strengthening the pelvic floor muscle, providing greater muscle control.

Intermittent self-catheterization, in which a small tube is inserted into the urethra to empty the bladder, can prevent the bladder from overfilling and help prevent urinary infections.

There are many pharmaceutical options available for bladder control. In addition, PTNS, Interstim, and Botox are all in office procedures that can have a positive effect on bladder control for many patients.

Talk to your doctor about your options to find one that works best for you.

References: 1. National MS Society: https://www.nationalmssociety.org/Symptoms-Diagnosis/MS-Symptoms

Video Roundup – Four Inspiring Stories Of People Who Have Overcome Neurogenic Bladders

4 Inspiring Stories of People Who Have Overcome Neurogenic Bladder

Becoming paralyzed or learning that you have MS or another neurological condition is anyone’s worst nightmare. The everyday freedoms that most of us take for granted suddenly become the main focus of life and things that were easy before become monumentally more difficult. We’ve rounded up stories from 4 inspiring people who have overcome tremendous obstacles and are determined to live life on their own terms. Watch their amazing stories in the links below.

Botox Injections For Neurogenic Bladder

Watch this self-taped video from Paralyzed Living about how he uses Botox injections to treat his neurogenic bladder.

Daniela’s Story

Watch Daniela’s inspiring story of how a freak accident left her a quadriplegic, unable to use her legs, and limited use of her arms and hands. Daniela struggled with bladder management, and finally took matters into her own hands by conducting extensive research into her options and finding a solution that has helped her regain her independence.

Audrey’s story

Audrey became paralyzed after an accident and suffered from bowel issues, but found the freedom to do what she wants from using Peristeen, a product for bowel management.

Amy’s Story

MS can wreak havoc on your bladder, resulting in urgent and frequent trips to the restroom, and in some cases, leakage. Watch this story from Amy, on how she used Botox to help her regain control.

Amy’s Video Diary – Before:  

Amy’s Video Diary – After:

Do you have your own story you’d like to share? Contact us!

Our Favorite Avocado Recipe: Guacamole!

Our Favorite Avocado Recipe: Guacamole!

It’s National MS Month and we’re celebrating by whipping up a snack that’s super good for you – especially if you have MS. Avocados are a terrific source of healthy unsaturated fat and are chock full of antioxidants. In fact, a 2013 study from Food and Function found that avocados are so good for you that they may counteract other foods that are, well, not so good for you. Subjects were fed either a plain hamburger patty, or one with avocado. Those who ate the plain burger showed a spike of IL-6 (a protein that is a measure of inflammation) four hours after it was eaten, however those who ate the burger with avocado saw little change in IL-6 over the same 4 hours. Plus, triglyceride levels (which, when elevated, can contribute to diabetes, heart disease and kidney disease) also did not rise after eating the burger with avocado (more than after eating the burger alone), despite the added fat and calories of the avocado.

There are tons of great ways to take advantage of this super food – toss some slices atop a sandwich, throw them in a salad, or, our personal favorite, whip up a delicious side of guacamole. 

The Best guacamole Recipe

Ingredients

  • 2 large ripe avocados
  • 1/4 cup lime juice
  • 1/2 tsp cumin
  • 1 clove garlic, minced
  • dash of sea salt
  • 1 chopped tomato (seeds removed)
  • 1/2 cup chopped red pepper
  • 1 chopped jalapeño pepper (omit this if you don’t like the heat)
  • 1/4 cup chopped red onion
  • 1 tablespoon cilantro

Directions

In a large bowl, mix the chopped avocado, lime juice cumin, garlic, and salt. Then fold in the tomato, red pepper jalapeño, red onion, and cilantro. Serve with chips, on top of a burger, or as a dip for veggies.

What Is Neurogenic Bladder?

What Is Neurogenic Bladder?

Having a neurological condition presents many challenges, but one that few people likely think about until they are dealing with it is how the condition may affect your ability to use the restroom. Like many organs, the bladder is controlled by nerves that connect to your brain and spinal cord. When these functions are challenged due to a neurological condition, it can cause a person to have a neurogenic bladder.

What is Neurogenic Bladder?

Neurogenic bladder happens when there is a lack of bladder control due to a brain, spinal cord or nerve problem. Typically, the bladder has two functions – storing urine, and removing it from the body. These functions are controlled by communication in the spinal cord and brain. When a person’s nerves, brain or spinal cord become injured, the way they communicate with the bladder can become compromised.

There are two types of neurogenic bladder: the bladder can become overactive (spastic or hyper-reflexive), or under-active (flaccid or hypotonic).

With an overactive bladder, patients experience strong and frequent urges to use the bathroom, and sometimes have trouble making it in time, resulting in urinary incontinence.

In an under-active bladder, the sphincter muscles may not work correctly and may stay tight when you are trying to empty your bladder, resulting in urinary retention (producing only a small amount of urine) or obstructive bladder (when you are unable to empty your bladder at all). In either case, treatment is available.

What Causes Neurogenic Bladder?

Neurogenic bladder can be caused by a number of conditions. Some children are born with neurogenic bladder. Children born with spina bifida (when the fetus’ spine does not completely develop during the first month of pregnancy), sacral agenesis (when lower parts of the spine are missing), or cerebral palsy (a disorder that weakens a person’s ability to control body movement and posture) all may suffer from neurogenic bladder due to their conditions. Other medical conditions that may cause neurogenic bladder are Parkinson’s disease, Multiple Sclerosis (MS), spinal cord injury, stroke, or central nervous system tumors.

What Are The Treatment Options For Neurogenic Bladder?

Luckily, there are many treatment options for neurogenic bladder. Treatments vary depending on whether you have overactive bladder or urinary retention. To learn about treatments for these conditions, click through the links below.

Treatments for Overactive Bladder

Treatments for Urinary Retention

A neurogenic bladder doesn’t have to limit your life. Don’t be afraid to explore your options and find a treatment that works for you.

Do you have a neurogenic bladder? Tell us about your experience in the comments below – we’d love to hear about treatment options that have worked for you!