Bedwetting In Teens - Possible Causes And What To Do About It

Bedwetting In Teens - Possible Causes And What To Do About It.

Bedwetting In Teens - Possible Causes And What To Do About It.

Do you have a teen who is still wetting the bed? You’re not alone. Many teens struggle with nocturnal enuresis, a fancy term for nighttime bedwetting. And while it can be frustrating and emotionally draining for both you, and your teen, most of the time, they will grow out of it.

There are several reasons a teenager may be struggling with staying dry at night:

  • They have a small bladder.
  • They are deep sleepers.
  • They are constipated.
  • There is a family history of bedwetting.
  • They produce too much urine overnight
  • They are experiencing a stressful situation or a big change (new school, change in family dynamic, trouble with friends, etc.)

All of these things may contribute to a teens bedwetting problem.  So, what can you do to help them?  The first course of action is to contact a physician as soon as you can to help set up a treatment plan.  Be supportive of your teen and try not to make a big deal out of it – it’s very likely that your teen is already extremely embarrassed about wetting the bed. Talk with them about it, and show them how to clean themselves, and their bedding when they have an accident. You don’t want to encourage them to hide their problem, but constantly having to ask you for help may make them feel even more embarrassed. 

Below are options to consider if your teenager is still wetting the bed.

Try a bedwetting alarm.

These alarms detect moisture and can alert a teen if they are starting to have an accident. Over time, this can help condition them to wake up and use the bathroom when they need to go.

Bladder retraining.

Just like other muscles in the body, the bladder can be trained to empty at specific times. Learn more about how to retrain your bladder here. 

Medications.

There are several medications that can help with bedwetting in teens and adults. Talk to your doctor to see if this may be a good option for your teen.

Limit fluids before bedtime.

Try to avoid drinking too much about an hour before bedtime, and always be sure to empty your bladder prior to going to bed.

Try the NAFC Dry Night Solution Kit.

Sometimes, the right protection can make all the difference. NAFC's Bedwetting kit allows you to try out several products at a very low price, making it a great way to find out what works for you. Learn more here.

Incorporating Biofeedback Into Your Pelvic Floor Strengthening Routine

Incorporating biofeedback into your pelvic floor STRENGTHENING routine 

Incorporating biofeedback into your pelvic floor STRENGTHENING routine 

The pelvic floor is made up of a series of muscles that act as a “sling” and support different organs in the body.  Keeping those muscles strong is important for a host of reasons – they help to prevent prolapse, reduce or prevent the symptoms of incontinence, and can even lead to more satisfying sex.  But how do you strengthen those muscles?  And how do you know what you are doing is effective for the long run?

We recommend starting your pelvic floor exercise search with a trained physical therapist (PT) specializing in women’s health.  Your PT will educate you on what muscles connect to the pelvic floor (there are 45!) and how to work all of them in order to keep things working properly.  Many people know of kegels but are unaware of the variety-- and combination-- of workouts that can benefit the pelvic floor. Because the pelvic floor connects to so many other muscles in the body, a workout plan that incorporates strengthening all of these muscles will ensure that you are not placing too big of a strain on any one muscle group.

In addition to specific movements or workouts, your PT may also incorporate biofeedback into your sessions. Biofeedback is a system that reports how well you are performing kegel contractions and can be an indicator of how strong your pelvic muscles are. 

Biofeedback is a great way to actually see how you’re performing in the moment.  Typically, a probe is inserted into the vagina, and sensors on the probe relay information back to a screen or meter.  When you contract your pelvic floor muscles, a reading appears on the screen that tells you how tightly you are squeezing, and for how long. 

Talk to your doctor about biofeedback to see if it might be an option for you.