Ask The Expert: Should I Get Vaccinations If I Have IBD?

 Should I Get Vaccinations If I Have IBD?

Each month, we ask our expert panel to answer one of our reader's questions. To learn more about the NAFC Expert Panel, and how to submit your own question, see below.

Question: I suffer from IBD and have always thought that vaccines would place me at a greater risk for developing an infection due to an already compromised auto-immune system. Is this true?

Answer: Many patients with IBD believe that they should not get certain vaccinations because they are concerned about side effects, and think that the vaccines won’t benefit them. But the truth is, IBD already is placing patients at a greater risk for developing vaccine-preventable illnesses. This is even more true if you are on an immunosuppressive therapy. This is why it’s important to talk to your doctor about vaccinations to ensure that you’re getting the protection you need. 

Guidelines recommend vaccinating prior to starting immunosuppressive therapy, since the efficacy of the vaccine is higher in non-immunosuppressed IBD patients.

And while it is generally recommended that all adults with IBD receive non-live vaccines (in line with the national guidelines), certain live vaccines may not be recommended for some patients.

Talk to your doctor about the vaccines you need and determine a plan for getting up to date.

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Ask The Expert: What's The Difference Between IBS And Crohn's Disease?

 What's The Difference Between IBS and Crohns Disease

Each month, we ask our expert panel to answer one of our reader's questions. To learn more about the NAFC Expert Panel, and how to submit your own question, see below.

Question: What’s the difference between IBS and Crohn’s Disease? Could I have both?

Answer: While both of these conditions seem to have similar symptoms, they are in fact different, and, yes, it is possible for someone to have both at the same time. Here’s a quick breakdown of the two:

Crohn’s Disease is a chronic, inflammatory bowel disease that affects parts of the digestive tract. Symptoms often include diarrhea, a frequent need to move your bowels, stomach pain, and bloating (all symptoms of IBS). However, with Crohn’s disease, patients also may notice things like vomiting, tiredness, weight loss, fever, or even bleeding.  It’s not certain what causes Crohn’s disease, but most experts believe it is an abnormality in the immune system that can trigger the condition. Chron’s disease is also more common in those with a family history of the disease.

IBS (also called “spastic colon”) carries similar symptoms to Crohn’s disease – cue the diarrhea, frequent trips to the bathroom, and stomach pain.  However, treatment for Crohn’s disease and IBS are different so it pays to be examined for both so that you understand what is causing your symptoms and you can treat it appropriately.  Testing for both conditions can be done with a physical exam, blood test, and usually a colonoscopy or other type of endoscopy procedure.

If you experience any symptoms related to IBS or Crohn’s disease, make an appointment with your doctor today to get tested.

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Ask The Expert: What's The Best Adult Absorbent Product On The Market?

 What's The Best Adult Absorbent Product On The Market?

Each month, we ask our expert panel to answer one of our reader's questions. To learn more about the NAFC Expert Panel, and how to submit your own question, see below.

QuestionWhen I go to the grocery store, I'm faced with a wall of different incontinence products. How do I choose what's right for me? What’s the best adult absorbent product on the market?

Answer:  This is a really tough question, and to be honest, there’s no one answer. Finding an absorbent product that’s right for you takes patients and depends on your specific circumstances. 

We always recommend paying attention to what we call the “3 F’s”, Form, Fit, and Function. First and foremost, it’s important to look for a good fit (you don’t want anything too big or too small, as both of those factors can cause leaks).

Next, you’ll want to think about function and how you need the product to work for – do you leak urine during the day or at night? When you do leak, is it just a little bit, or a lot? There are different products for all of these specific problems so you’ll want to consider what you struggle with the most and pay attention to the packaging and description of the products your choosing. 

Finally, think about form, which relates directly to your lifestyle. Are you very active? Absorbent briefs or pads may work best. Are you confined to a bed or chair? You may want to look for something easier to remove. All of these factors play an important part in choosing an absorbent product that works for you.

As for specific brands of incontinence products, there are a lot out there, even beyond what you may find in a big box store.  Do your homework and look online too. Online shopping for absorbents has it’s own benefits, like greater selection, and being able to shop privately in your own home.  Many online retailers also have consultants on hand to help you weed through the massive selection of products based on your specific needs.

Good luck, and remember to keep trying. It may take a several tries to find “the one” but once you do, the peace of mind to know that you’re protected, and comfortable, will be worth the effort.

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Ask The Expert: Should Men Do Kegels?

 Should Men Do Kegels?

Question: I hear about kegels for women all the time, but what about men? Can kegels benefit men too?

Expert Answer: Absolutely!  Kegels are an important part of a woman’s workout routine to prevent or manage bladder leaks, but they are just as important for men. In men, kegels can help with fecal incontinence, overactive bladder, urinary retention, erectile functioning and even orgasms.  Interested in seeing the benefits for yourself? Here’s how to do them:

How To Do Kegels For Men

There are two types of kegel exercises that you can do to strengthen and tone your pelvic floor muscles.

Long Contractions.  

Long Contractions work on the supportive strength of the muscles. To perform a long kegel contraction, tighten your pelvic muscles and hold for 5 seconds. This may be difficult at first – don’t worry if you can’t hold the contraction for the full five seconds. With practice you’ll be able to work up to this.

Overtime, work your way up to 10 seconds per contraction. Be sure to rest for 10 seconds in between each contraction – knowing how to relax your muscle is as important as the contraction.

Short Contractions.  

Short contractions work the fast twitch muscles that work quickly to stop the flow of urine and prevent leaks. To perform a short contraction, tighten your muscles quickly, then release, and repeat.

When Should I Perform Them?

Like any muscle, you don’t want to do too much too soon. Aim for 5 reps of both short and long contractions, 3x per day on your first day. As you gain more confidence and strength, work your way up to 10 reps, 3x per day of each.

Continue practicing kegels and you should see improvements in 3-6 months. And, if you find that you need some help with kegels, talk to your doctor or physical therapist. They will be able to provide you with more personal instruction, which may include biofeedback therapy.

Good luck!

Ask The Expert: How Do I Keep Myself Odor Free When I Have Incontinence?

 How Do I Keep Myself Odor Free When I Have Incontinence?

Each month, we ask our expert panel to answer one of our reader's questions. To learn more about the NAFC Expert Panel, and how to submit your own question, see below.

Question:  I live with incontinence and am often concerned about others noticing a certain “smell” about me. How do I ensure that my incontinence problem lead to an odor problem?

Answer: Many people with incontinence often worry about this issue. But, it’s an easy one to solve as long as you’re diligent in following a few simple steps.

1. Change often.

If you wear absorbent pads, make sure you change them often to avoid smell. Fit and type of product is also important – a close fitting product will hold odors better than something that fits too loosely, and some products have odor-reducing materials built in, which can help prevent smells. In addition, stool or urine get onto your bedding or clothing, wash them right away, or place them in an airtight container until you are able to wash them to prevent odors from making their way throughout your house. If you’re on the go, pack a disposable plastic ziplock bag to store any soiled clothing due to leaks.

2. Drink plenty of fluids.

While many people with incontinence may try to limit their fluids, you should never do so to the limit that you become dehydrated. Drinking too little fluid throughout the day makes your urine more concentrated, and more likely to smell. The general guidance is 6-8 glasses a day. You’ll know if you’re drinking enough water by the color of your urine – clear urine with almost no color (and hardly any smell) is a good sign your staying hydrated – if your urine is a concentrated yellow, it could be a sign you need to drink a bit more.

3. Be diligent about hygiene.

It’s essential that you wash daily and clean yourself well after any accidents and after each pad or application change with a gentle cleanser.  If your skin becomes irritated, you can use a moisturizer or a protective ointment. The best line of defense against odor is ensuring that skin is kept clean and absorbent products are frequently changed or washed.

Read about more tips to stay clean and odor free! 

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Ask The Expert: How Do I Avoid Leaks When Visiting Loved Ones?

 How Do I Avoid Leaks When Visiting Loved Ones?

Each month, we ask our expert panel to answer one of our reader's questions. To learn more about the NAFC Expert Panel, and how to submit your own question, see below.

Question: I suffer from incontinence and will be visiting my daughter for 3 weeks this holiday season. I’m terrified I’ll have an accident at her house. Do you have any precautions I can take to avoid leaks and the accompanying embarrassment?

Answer: This is a common concern and is a great topic to discuss around the holidays. There are many things you can do to avoid leaks, as well as a few things you can have at the ready in case a leak does happen at your loved one’s home.  

As always, preparation is key, and will help give you some peace of mind knowing that you have the proper products in place to prevent leaks. Be sure to bring plenty of supplies with you: absorbent products for day and night, extra changes of clothes (black is a great color choice since it goes with everything and hides leaks well), and extra medication, if you’re on it. After all, when traveling during the winter season, anything is possible and delayed or canceled flights can leave you unprepared – pack extras so that you have enough to last you for a few extra days just in case. If you have trouble at night, bring your own waterproof pad (or two) to protect the bedding. Don’t forget about any other supplies you may need – skin protectants or cleansers, detergents for doing a load of laundry, disposable plastic bags to hold used or wet products, and an odor neutralizing spray to hide any unwanted odors.

An extra bag can help you transport and hide your supplies, as well as serve as a place to store used products or clothes that you can dispose of when convenient for you.  And if you’re a woman, upgrade your purse to a tote bag that can hold extra supplies you may need when you’re out and about.

Finally, the holidays can be a time of indulgence, so watch what you’re eating and drinking. Skip the coffee and alcohol, limit spicy foods and sweets, and avoid any foods that you know irritate your bladder. 

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Ask The Expert: How Do I Know If My Bladder Leaks Are Serious Enough To Talk To A Doctor About?

 When Should I Talk To A Doctor About Bladder Leaks?

Each month, we ask our expert panel to answer one of our reader's questions. To learn more about the NAFC Expert Panel, and how to submit your own question, see below.

Question: How do I know if my bladder leaks are serious enough to talk to a doctor about?

Answer: This is a great question, and one that we wish more people would ask. Bladder leaks are a bit like a leaky faucet. Annoying at first, but something that most people ignore for a while. However, given too much time, what started as a small faucet leak can turn into a full-blown problem. The same is true with your bladder. What may start as an annoying occasional problem can get worse over time if left untreated. Many patients wait too long to get treatment, for a variety of reasons – they don’t think their problems is that bad, they are embarrassed to talk about it, they feel like they can manage it on their own. However over time, the condition can worsen and incontinence can truly become a part of daily life, which is something no one wants to deal with.

Here are three questions to ask yourself when wondering if you should get treated for bladder leaks:

  1. Is this problem affecting my daily life, even a little?
  2. Does it bother me that I have to make adjustments for my bladder leaks (like always finding the nearest bathroom when you’re out, bringing along a change of clothes just in case, or having the occasional leak.)?
  3. Will I feel upset years from now when I look back on this time, and wish that I had done more to treat this issue?

If you answered YES to any of the above three questions, it’s time to talk to your doctor. Any condition that is keeping you from living your fullest life is one that should be seen to. Don’t wait another minute – with so many treatment options, for bladder leakage there is just no reason to not get help.

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Ask The Expert: Is Urinary Incontinence A Normal Part Of Aging?

 Is Urinary Incontinence A Normal Part Of Aging?

Each month, we ask our expert panel to answer one of our reader's questions. To learn more about the NAFC Expert Panel, and how to submit your own question, see below.

Question: Is Urinary Incontinence A Normal Part Of Aging?

Answer: We get this question all the time, and suspect that many people believe this, even though it’s not really true. Here are the facts:

While incontinence should never be considered a normal occurrence, our chances of getting it do increase as we get older. Certain life events (childbirth, for example) can cause the muscles and tissues to weaken, and, over time can result in urinary incontinence. Other conditions can also play a role – neurological conditions such as MS or Parkinson’s Disease, being overweight, or prostate problems in men can all contribute to bladder leakage.

So, in a way, yes, as you get older, you may be more likely to experience urinary incontinence, but it’s typically a symptom of something else. And it most certainly can be treated. Lifestyle changes, such as diet and exercise (especially performing moves that increase the strength of the pelvic floor) can do wonders in improving symptoms of incontinence. And, if that doesn’t work, medications, minimally invasive procedures (like Botox injections or InterStim) or even surgery are all options for treating the issue.

The most important thing to take away is that having bladder leakage is not a lost cause. If you live with this symptom, find a doctor and talk about your options. Life’s too short to live with a condition that has so many options for treatment.

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Ask The Expert: What's The Best Way To Prevent UTI's When You Have A Neurogenic Bladder?

UTI's and neurogenic bladder

Question:  What’s the best way to prevent UTI’s when you have a neurogenic bladder?

Answer:  Unfortunately, Urinary Tract Infections are common in patients with neurogenic bladder. Patients with neurogenic bladder often have a harder time completely emptying their bladder. They also are often unable to sense that the bladder is full, resulting in them holding urine for too long.  Some patients also self catheterize, or use indwelling catheters, which can present complications leading to a UTI.

Of course, the best treatment of a UTI is prevention. 

Below are 2 simple steps that patients living with neurogenic bladders can take to avoid bladder infections.

1. Keep things clean.

It stands to reason that keeping yourself, and any equipment used to assist with voiding, hygienic can help keep bacteria at bay. Be sure to properly clean your body, and any external catheters after each use. Always wash hands before and after self-catheterizing.  During a short-term infection, change indwelling catheters and be sure that the bladder fully empties to prevent urine from remaining in the bladder for too long.

2. Develop a voiding schedule.

While many things are considered when deciding when to catheterize, including patient and caregiver schedules and urine production, steps should be taken to ensure that the bladder is emptied frequently to prevent infections. Develop a schedule that works for you and stick to it.

UTI’s can cause many complications for people with Neurogenic Bladder, including decreased quality of life and other serious health concerns. If you are experiencing any common signs of a UTI, call your doctor.

Common signs of a UTI:

  • Fever
  • Urinary incontinence/leaking around the catheter
  • Cloudy urine
  • Spasticity
  • Back pain
  • Bladder pain
  • Lethargy
  • Painful or difficult urination
  • Sudden, high blood pressure

ASK THE EXPERT: Do I Really Need To Avoid Sugar And Alcohol If I Have Incontinence?

Each month, we ask our expert panel to answer one of our reader's questions. To learn more about the NAFC Expert Panel, and how to submit your own question, see below.

Question: It’s the holidays, and it’s hard to avoid all the goodies and treats around me.  Do things like sugar and alcohol really make a difference in my incontinence symptoms?

Answer: While it may not be what you want to hear, the answer is yes.  Let’s start with sugar.  Sugar (even the artificial kind) is a known bladder irritant – especially for those with overactive bladder – and too much of it can keep you running to the bathroom more times than you’d want during the holidays. Not only that, consuming too much sugar causes the kidneys to work harder to flush the sugar out of the blood, which can result in an increase in the amount of urine you’re holding onto – not a good thing if you already have a leakage problem. High blood sugar levels have also been shown to increase the risk of urinary tract infections.

And now alcohol. Alcohol is a diuretic. It increases urine production which can lead to increased frequency and urgency of needing to use the restroom. In addition, alcoholic beverages can stimulate the bladder, which can also lead to incontinence.

In short – both sugar and alcohol should be avoided as much as possible for those with incontinence or overactive bladder. If you do plan to indulge this holiday season, remember that moderation is key. 

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Ask The Expert: Protective Underwear or Adult Absorbent Briefs - What's The Difference?

 What's The Difference Between Protective Underwear And Absorbent Briefs?

Each month, we ask our expert panel to answer one of our reader's questions. To learn more about the NAFC Expert Panel, and how to submit your own question, see below.

Question: What is the difference between protective underwear (pull-ups) and adult absorbent briefs?

Answer: In the world of absorbent products, it can be hard to find something that works with your needs.  Most adults who wet the bed use some type of protection, usually protective underwear, or an adult absorbent brief.  

Protective underwear are designed to mimic real underwear, and, unlike absorbent briefs, do not have any tape or velcro siding. Many who prefer this pull-on option like it because of it’s convenience - pull ups are easy to put on or remove, and give users a sense of freedom from the typical brief style.  

Absorbent briefs are similar to protective underwear, but have side tabs that can be adjusted for comfort and fit.  Although they may not be as convenient, many prefer this option since they are able to adjust the side tabs, therefore creating a more custom, snug fit which can prevent leaks.  

Choosing the option that is right for you or your loved one may involve some trial and error, and will depend on your circumstances. Do you wake up often at night to use the restroom? Protective underwear may work best for you due to the ease of pulling them on and off. Do you care for someone who is more bedridden and needs more assistance with getting in and out of bed or changing clothes?  Briefs may be preferred since the tabs make it easier to find a good fit and can be easier for caretakers to change.  

Of course, finding a product that will keep you dry is the biggest goal, and relies heavily on fit (it shouldn’t be too big or too small), absorbency (look for products that are specific to night-time use), and function.  Don’t be afraid to try lots of options until you find something that fits well and is comfortable.  

ASK THE EXPERT: HOW DO I TALK TO MY LOVED ONE ABOUT INCONTINENCE?

 How Do I Talk To My Loved One About Incontinence

Question: I’ve had a hard time discussing my father’s incontinence with him - he is so embarrassed by it and never wants to address it. How can I bring the subject up without making him uncomfortable?

Answer:  Caring for a parent with incontinence can be very hard.  After all, you’ve both played opposite roles for most of your life, with your parent providing most of the care for you. When a parent becomes dependent on their child, and especially when they are experiencing something like incontinence, it can make them feel ashamed and embarrassed. They may try to hard to hide their incontinence, or brush off mention of it and try to avoid the subject all together.

Start slowly. Discuss their health and condition and then talk to them about some of the incontinence symptoms you’ve witnessed.  Be patient - they may have some reservations in discussing their problem with you at first. But give them some time - once they feel comfortable, they’ll open up to you and you’ll be able to work on a management plan together.  

Ask The Expert: Surgery For BPH?

 Ask The Expert: Surgery For BPH?

Each month, we ask our expert panel to answer one of our reader's questions. To learn more about the NAFC Expert Panel, and how to submit your own question, see below.

Question: What types of surgery options are available for BPH?

Answer: BPH, or Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia, is when a man’s prostate is enlarged.  BPH is a common occurrence in aging men, but may not always require surgery.  Surgery may be considered if you have certain issues (you can’t urinate, have seen blood in your urine, have a partial blockage in your urethra, or have kidney damage), or if your symptoms are so bothersome that surgery makes sense to you.

The typical surgical option that is usually used is transurethral surgery of the prostate.  This is where surgical instruments are passed through the opening in the penis to the prostate. Transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) is the most common type of transurethral surgery used for BPH. This is when a portion of the prostate is removed.  Other methods of removing some of the prostate include laser therapies, transurethral microwave therapy (TUMT), or transurethral needle ablation (TUNA).  Transurethral incision of the prostate (TUIP) is also sometimes used, which places incisions on the prostate which help to relax the opening to the bladder and allow urine to flow from the bladder more freely.

If you are considering surgery for BPH, talk with your doctor about these options and decide together which one may be the best for you.

The NAFC Expert Panel is made up of some of the top medical professionals in the fields of urology, urogynecology, physical therapy, and surgery. Each month, the experts weigh in on important topics and answers to your questions.  To have one of your questions featured in our Ask an Expert series, send it to us here.

Ask The Expert: Physical Therapy After Childbirth

 ASK THE EXPERT

ASK THE EXPERT

Each month, we ask an expert to answer one of our reader's questions.  This month we're happy to welcome Victoria Yeisly, DPT as our expert contributor.

Question: I’ve heard that in Europe it is standard for most women to begin physical therapy to strengthen their pelvic floor as soon as they have given birth.

Do you think women in the United States should be seeing a PT after having a baby, regardless of whether they are having symptoms or not?

Expert Answer:Absolutely!  I support this practice for any woman after having a baby, including both vaginal and C-section deliveries.  Think about it, during the pregnancy, the body changes so drastically, so quickly!  Ligaments loosen; alignment changes, hormones fluctuate, and anywhere from 20-50 lbs may be gained.  Then, you either push a baby out of your vagina or have a major abdominal surgery.  To think that the body just heals and is “back to normal” 6 weeks postpartum is just ridiculous.  In the OB practice where I work, there are 4 of us pelvic floor PTs integrated with the doctors and midwives to help serve this population so women can return to pre-baby function with greater ease and comfort.  In my opinion, this should be the standard of practice for all women.  At minimum, doctors and midwives should at least be making each woman aware of this treatment and let them decide if pelvic floor PT should be a part of their postpartum rehabilitation.  

Have a question you'd like answered? Ask us! Your question may be featured in an upcoming Ask An Expert post!

About Our Expert:  Victoria Yeisley, DPT, has been exclusively practicing pelvic floor physical therapy for the past eight years, with an emphasis on prenatal and post-partum care.  She currently lives in Chicago, IL, and practices at Northwestern Medical Group OBGYN, where she is integrated into the OBGYN healthcare team, as well as working at Chicago Physical Therapists, a private practice.  Victoria is passionate about the care and support of women during the childbearing years and her goal is to increase the awareness of the importance of women's health and treating pelvic floor dysfunction throughout the lifespan.  She is currently pregnant with her first child and expecting in June of 2016!

It's All About The Base: Learning How To Work Out Your Pelvic Floor

 It's All About The Base

We all have health goals. They are often about being more health conscious and physically active.  I’ve heard varying goals from “I want to lose 15 pounds” to “I want to be able to run my first marathon,” but rarely do I hear “I want a stronger pelvic floor” or “I want to be able to jump or exercise without leaking urine every time.” In fact, most people don’t even know about these muscles and how essential a strong pelvic floor is for everyday function.  

The pelvic floor is an amazing set of muscles that span inside your pelvis, from your pubic bones to your tailbone, that act as the base of your core.  They work to control your bladder and bowel and maintain continence, allow for pain-free and enjoyable intercourse, hold up the pelvic organs and help stabilize the pelvic girdle and spine…that’s a lot of responsibility for muscles that are often neglected in the daily workout plan.

As a pelvic floor specialist, I am often asked “How do I work out my pelvic floor?”  The fact is, most people don’t know how to turn on their muscles the RIGHT way.  They are often trying so hard to squeeze as tight as possible that they are engaging everything but their pelvic floor! They will hold their breath, clench their butt, squeeze their inner thighs, tighten up their abdominals and totally miss the boat. 

A pelvic floor contraction, or Kegel, is a very subtle feeling.  It includes a compression and lifting of the muscles deep inside the pelvis, like you are trying to suck a marble up with your vagina or lift your testicles in fear of walking into ice cold water!  Too frank? Well then imagine that you are stopping the flow of urine, which is actually a good test to see if you are engaging the RIGHT muscles.  You can always tighten your pelvic floor mid-stream and see if you can stop, or at least slow down the flow, but this should just be a test, and never a means to actually exercise these muscles.

Although the pelvic floor is the star of this article, you have to also understand that these muscles don’t work in isolation.  Remember that the pelvic floor is the BASE of the core, but also works with other muscles as an integrated system.  The major supporter of the pelvic floor is the diaphragm, which is the dome-shaped muscle at the bottom of the rib cage that is essential for breathing. 

When you take a deep breath in through your nose, your rib cage expands and the diaphragm moves downwards, changing the pressure system in your abdomen so your pelvic floor muscles RELAX.  As you exhale through your mouth, the diaphragm moves upwards, and again, the intra-abdominal pressure is changed, and the pelvic floor returns to its resting position.  Wow! Who knew that just practicing breathing could also be working the pelvic floor!

If you want to get fancy, you can coordinate the two muscle groups together:  

Start lying on your back with your knees bent.  Place each hand on the side of your rib cage. Inhale deeply through your nose, imagining your rib cage is expanding in all directions into your hands, and keep your pelvic floor relaxed.  As you exhale through your mouth, let your rib cage return to resting position and gently tighten your pelvic floor muscles and hold for up to five seconds, then release.  Repeat this sequence for a good 5-10 minutes each day…it’s more about the quality of the breathing and pelvic floor contractions, not just the quantity.  (If you are a numbers kind of person, then try to shoot for 30-50 contractions a day.)

It is essential that you allow for the relaxing aspect of this exercise.  Like any other muscle in the body, we need to make sure the pelvic floor is able to go through its entire range of motion, which means it should be able to tighten, and then release or relax, so it can be able to contract again.  Remember that these muscles are working 100% of the time, and in order to maintain a strong pelvic floor, you need to let these muscles RELAX in between each contraction

 As you feel more comfortable with this exercise, try it sitting or standing, so you can start working out your pelvic floor throughout the day. The beauty of exercising your base is that no one even knows you are doing it!  You can be standing in line at the grocery store or sitting in your car, waiting for the light to turn green, and BAM!  You are working your base out!  Even better, think about integrating your pelvic floor and diaphragm into your gym routine, especially lifting weights or doing other core work.

I dare you to start thinking about exercising all aspects of your core, especially your pelvic floor.  Remember, it’s all about the base!

Victoria Yeisley, DPT, has been specializing in pelvic floor physical therapy since 2008.  She completed her Doctor of Physical Therapy at Boston University and currently works with Northwestern Medical Group in Chicago, IL, where she is integrated as a part of the OB-GYN team.  Victoria’s passion lies in empowering her patients to not only be educated about their pelvic floor, but to gain control over their symptoms.  She feels extremely lucky to be able to practice her passion every day and hopes to be able to continue to promote pelvic floor muscle awareness for all!