'

GET ACTIVE

Encourage others to start talking and gain control of their bladder health!  We've made it simple for you to share National Bladder Health Week news, resources, tips and tools with your friends, family and healthcare providers.  We have a variety of  simple activities you can choose from to promote awareness of bladder health.  They are cut and paste one of the sample newsletter or emails below.

1415 Stuart Engals Blvd
Mt Pleasant, SC, 29464
United States

843 419-5307

NAFC is a non-profit offering resources for people struggling with incontinence, adult bedwetting, OAB, SUI, nocturia, neurogenic bladder, and pelvic floor disorders like prolapse. 

INCONTINENCE STORIES FROM EXPERTS AND REAL PEOPLE | BHEALTH

Log in to the BHealth blog to hear expert advice, real stories from people suffering from incontinence issues, tips on managing adult bedwetting, how to care for a loved one, and how to maintain a healthy pelvic floor.

 

Pelvic Floor Exercises Specifically For Men

Sarah Jenkins

A guest blog written by Michelle Herbst, PT

As a physical therapist specializing in pelvic floor rehabilitation we are referred to as women’s health physical therapists. But, this a little of a misnomer as men have pelvic floors and can have concerns too. In my experience, men participating in pelvic floor rehabilitation make the best patients. They are engaged, compliant and determined to positively affect their condition.  

Kegels for Men:

Kegels for men can help with erectile dysfunction and urinary and fecal incontinence. They are most effective when performed in a consistent, specific manner and progressed slowly over time. Here are a few ideas and tips for men to consider when performing kegels.

A kegel is a contraction of the pelvic floor muscles. It feels like a gentle pulling up and in of the pelvic floor followed by a relaxation of the entire muscle group. The kegel contraction begins with a slight lift of the tail bone moving forward as a gentle tightening of the muscles between and tail bone and pubic bone. Lastly, the lower abdominals contract slightly. Then the muscles gently release or relax. There may be a feeling of a reversal of the contraction sequence.

There is no need for weights as our body weight and gravity provide resistance. The contraction is a sub-maximal in effort. If kegels are performed too hard and too fast the result may be muscle soreness and aggravation of symptoms. Performing a submaximal contraction is key and mild muscle soreness may be expected.

Avoid breath holding when kegeling. Repetitive contraction of the pelvic floor while holding the breath could aggravate prior back injuries or make pelvic floor symptoms worse. Normal breathing is the standard when kegeling. Your face should not be turning red. After normal breathing while kegeling is mastered you can further enhance the kegel during exhalation. A long exhalation during a kegel - such as you would blowing out a candle - can allow you to improve muscle performance. Here, give it a try: gently tighten the pelvic floor – take a deep breath in and slowing exhale like you are blowing out a candle while holding the kegel muscle contraction. Then release.

Kegels should be progressed gradually and can be progressed by increasing the hold time and number of repetitions. For example, when you first begin kegeling, you will want to measure how long you can hold the muscle contraction before the muscles ‘give away’ and release the kegel. If you can hold one kegel for 3 seconds, without breath holding, use that as your benchmark for holding time.  Next, work your way up to 10 contractions of 3-second holds. Repeat another set of 10 later in the day. Eventually you may work up to completing multiple sets of 10, 3 to 5 times per day while advancing the kegel-hold time to 10 seconds. And, please remember to relax between each consecutive kegel to avoid moderate muscle soreness.

Try kegeling in different positions. Use the above suggestions of progressing the kegel hold time and repetition and apply to your place in space. The combined effect of body weight and gravity can increase the resistance and difficulty of the kegel. For example, if you have been performing your kegels while lying down, try to perform them in a seated position, followed by standing and during your daily activities.

Lastly, consistency and patience are key. If you don’t take your medicine you will not get well. Continue to perform your kegels daily while your symptoms are improving and to maintain your gains. Be creative and patient with progressing kegels. Depending on your starting point it may take weeks or months to progress to performing multiple repetitions in functional positions. Do not give up too soon. Kegels - they are not just for women and can greatly improve a man’s overall health and quality of life. Give them a try.