'

GET ACTIVE

Encourage others to start talking and gain control of their bladder health!  We've made it simple for you to share National Bladder Health Week news, resources, tips and tools with your friends, family and healthcare providers.  We have a variety of  simple activities you can choose from to promote awareness of bladder health.  They are cut and paste one of the sample newsletter or emails below.

1415 Stuart Engals Blvd
Mt Pleasant, SC, 29464
United States

843 419-5307

NAFC is a non-profit offering resources for people struggling with incontinence, adult bedwetting, OAB, SUI, nocturia, neurogenic bladder, and pelvic floor disorders like prolapse. 

INCONTINENCE STORIES FROM EXPERTS AND REAL PEOPLE | BHEALTH

Log in to the BHealth blog to hear expert advice, real stories from people suffering from incontinence issues, tips on managing adult bedwetting, how to care for a loved one, and how to maintain a healthy pelvic floor.

 

What To Expect With A Hysterectomy

Sarah Jenkins

A hysterectomy is a surgical procedure done to remove a woman’s uterus. There are several potential reasons a woman may need a hysterectomy:

  • Uterine Fibroids that cause bleeding, pain and other problems
  • Abnormal vaginal bleeding
  • Chronic pelvic pains
  • Endometriosis
  • Cancer of uterus, ovaries or cervix

This operation is either done to remove the part or the entire uterus after going through a rigorous and thorough checkup. In United States, 1 out of 3 women have gone through hysterectomy by the age they are 60.  It is the second most common surgery in women, followed only by cesarean delivery.  The majority of this operation is done to treat noncancerous conditions in women.

Even though a hysterectomy is a fairly safe surgery, there are certain side effects associated with it. Some of these include problems related to anesthesia, infection, bleeding, blood clots, injury to internal organs and loss of ovarian functions, which means no menstruation. Some women also experience less interest in sex, which can be treated with hormone therapy. And, if this surgery is done before a woman reaches menopause, she may experience menopausal type symptoms, such as hot flashes, mood swings, and vaginal dryness.

A common side effect of having a hysterectomy is incontinence. After the surgery, nerves of the bladder may be damaged because of their nearness to uterus. This can cause stress incontinence, the involuntary release of urine during things like exercise, sexual activity, sneezing or coughing – all of which put increased pressure on the abdomen. Fortunately, there are many treatment options available, so if you have incontinence as a result of a hysterectomy, talk to your doctor about what you can do.  Physical therapy, medication, and in extreme cases, even surgery can be used to treat the problem.

While many women are happy to be relieved of the symptoms they experienced prior to a hysterectomy, the changes to a woman’s body after surgery can be drastic. A full recovery after hysterectomy generally takes 6-8 weeks, after which it is advised to start doing regular activities with caution. The body may need additional time to adjust to changes in hormone levels. 

Even though this is a common surgery, having a hysterectomy is a major decision for most women. There are several procedures commonly used for hysterectomy like abdominal, vaginal or laparoscopic. Your doctor will be able to walk you through the pros and cons of each option, and help you decide on what is best for you. Visit the NAFC Specialist Locator to find a specialist in your area.