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Encourage others to start talking and gain control of their bladder health!  We've made it simple for you to share National Bladder Health Week news, resources, tips and tools with your friends, family and healthcare providers.  We have a variety of  simple activities you can choose from to promote awareness of bladder health.  They are cut and paste one of the sample newsletter or emails below.

1415 Stuart Engals Blvd
Mt Pleasant, SC, 29464
United States

843 419-5307

NAFC is a non-profit offering resources for people struggling with incontinence, adult bedwetting, OAB, SUI, nocturia, neurogenic bladder, and pelvic floor disorders like prolapse. 

INCONTINENCE STORIES FROM EXPERTS AND REAL PEOPLE | BHEALTH

Check out the BHealth blog to hear expert advice, real stories from people suffering from incontinence issues, tips on managing adult bedwetting, how to care for a loved one, and how to maintain a healthy pelvic floor.

 

Preparing Your Pelvic Floor For Pregnancy And Beyond

Sarah Jenkins

A guest blog written by Michelle Herbst, PT

Congratulations! As you prepare for your baby there is a lot to think about. Doctor’s appointments. Baby showers. Child care. Nervous talks with the Dad-to-be. And, don’t forget - YOU. When you start sharing your news - everyone will give you advice. Some stories will be embellished for the good and others will be overstated for how difficult their pregnancy was. But, keep in mind - this is your experience.

Realistic Expectations:

Some Moms-to-be have problems with leakage. Others do not. A positive pregnancy test does not mean you will develop incontinence or a prolapse - which is a descent of the pelvic organs into the vaginal canal. But, normal changes during pregnancy and the process of labor and delivery can set up the conditions for incontinence and prolapse to occur.  

So, here is my advice as a Mom and a physical therapist for preparing your mind and body for your big day.

Kegel:

You will read about these. Your OB Nurse will ask, ‘Are you doing Kegels?’ But, why are Kegels so important during pregnancy?

Performing Kegels during pregnancy can help you prevent or manage bouts of leakage, and will also help you tune in and tone the muscles that will help push and slide your baby out of the birth canal. Here are a more few reasons why Kegels are so important:

-        To establish a mind-body connection of how the kegel muscles feel when activated.

-        To help create stability of spine and pelvis as your baby grows.

-        To prepare for the arrival of your baby and protection of your pelvic organs during delivery.

 

Labor can be quick or long. Labor can be easy or difficult. You do not get to choose. But, with preparation of your mind and muscles, along with the skills of your birthing team, the end result will be you holding your precious new baby.

Thoughts on Kegels during Pregnancy:

Think of the pelvic floor as a muscular sling that is tethered between your pelvic bone and tailbone. During pregnancy and labor the pelvic floor muscles lengthen but also need to be able push. The goal of performing Kegels during pregnancy is to improve the strength and function of the pelvic floor as well as encourage lengthening of the pelvic floor muscles.

When performing a Kegel it will feel like a gentle tightening and lifting up and in of the muscles between the pubic bone and tail bone. You may also feel a slight tightening between the belly button and pubic bone. That is your abdominals helping out too. That is OK. Now, hold the Kegel as you inhale and exhale. Relax, and let your pelvic floor muscles return to a normal resting tone or sensation.

The Kegel is a cyclic contraction. It is a shortening of the muscle fibers followed by a relaxation and lengthening of the muscles. If you contract the pelvic floor, and follow that with another pelvic floor contraction without focusing on letting the muscles relax and lengthen, you are training the pelvic floor to become shortened strong muscles not the lengthened strong muscles needed to help push and slide your baby out.

Squat:

Yes – squat. Deep squatting is a normal position to void and give birth. Performing a deep squat as an exercise will help you prepare for the positioning and muscle work needed during delivery.  Deep squatting will open your hips, aide in lengthening the pelvic floor and strengthen your glutes. 

How do I do this?

Slowly work into a squat. You may want to or need to keep your squat shallow by holding onto the back of a sturdy chair or counter top as you start bending at your hips and knees. Keep your gaze forward. Work on keeping your knees behind your toes or stacked above your ankle. Think about keeping your shins perpendicular to the floor. If you are able to get into a deep squat, you may want to place your hands at your chest and gently push your elbows to the inside of your knees.

How long and how many?

This will depend on you. You may want to focus on working into and holding the deep squat. Once you have achieved a deep squat you can work on relaxing into this position. Or, you may want to perform slow repetitions of a shallow squat to standing position and put your emphasis on tightening the glutes when returning to standing.

There really isn’t a right or wrong way – just your way and your focus or intent of the exercise. Pay attention to how you feel and listen to your body.

Your Story:

There will be aspects of your pregnancy and the arrival of your baby that you will not be able to control. But, remember, this is your story. You can prepare your mind and body to set up the best possible set of circumstances to deliver a healthy YOU to motherhood. 

Michelle Herbst, PT

Michelle Herbst, PT