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Encourage others to start talking and gain control of their bladder health!  We've made it simple for you to share National Bladder Health Week news, resources, tips and tools with your friends, family and healthcare providers.  We have a variety of  simple activities you can choose from to promote awareness of bladder health.  They are cut and paste one of the sample newsletter or emails below.

1415 Stuart Engals Blvd
Mt Pleasant, SC, 29464
United States

843 419-5307

NAFC is a non-profit offering resources for people struggling with incontinence, adult bedwetting, OAB, SUI, nocturia, neurogenic bladder, and pelvic floor disorders like prolapse. 

INCONTINENCE STORIES FROM EXPERTS AND REAL PEOPLE | BHEALTH

Log in to the BHealth blog to hear expert advice, real stories from people suffering from incontinence issues, tips on managing adult bedwetting, how to care for a loved one, and how to maintain a healthy pelvic floor.

 

The Hidden (And Not-So-Hidden) Dangers Of Treating Incontinence With Urinary Catheters

Sarah Jenkins

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This is the second in a 3-part series on urinary incontinence in men suffering with benign prostatic hyperplasia. Dr. Richard Roach, of Advanced Urology in Oxford, FL, discusses the challenges of using urinary catheters to treat men with BPH-related incontinence, and the drawbacks of long-term catheterization.  

 

In my last BHEALTH blog post, we touched on the peculiar, yet common link between BPH and incontinence. Among other topics, we reviewed the progression of BPH disease state, to the point that symptoms begin to manifest themselves through urge and stress incontinence. Likewise, we also discussed the role that urinary catheters play in men who are not good candidates for BPH therapies.

So let’s now take a closer look at this population of men who must rely on urinary catheters to manage BPH-related incontinence symptoms, and examine the shortcomings of long-term catheter use:

Losing the ability to void naturally: The first (and most obvious) drawback of chronic catheter use is losing the ability to urinate at-will. Of course, managing supplies and components can be a hassle, but there are also health concerns associated with preventing your bladder to fill and empty on its own. Chronic catheterization, particularly with an indwelling catheter, can increase the risk for deterioration in overall bladder health, which can lead to a permanent inability to store and drain urine naturally, or even cancer.

Heightened infection risk: Perhaps the most immediate health concern with chronic catheter use is the heightened risk of infection. According to the Centers for Disease Control, more than 500,000 patients each year in the U.S. develop urinary tract infections (UTIs) while in the hospital, and indwelling urinary catheters (commonly known as Foley catheters, which reside inside the bladder for either a short or long period of time) are the leading cause. And the CDC numbers only count UTIs acquired while in the hospital; many others develop infections from long-term indwelling catheter use at home.

Compromises to quality of life: The last, but no less important, drawback of chronic catheter use is the impact on quality of life. Many men are simply unable to perform day-to-day activities inside and outside the home. The embarrassment or inconvenience of a drainage bag is a commonly lamented life-limiter, and some types of catheterization restrict a man’s ability to be sexually active, which can strain relationships.

These challenges represent the key reasons that healthcare professionals around the world are seeking alternatives to long-term catheter use. And though it’s not always feasible to have a catheter removed, it’s important to point out that there are alternatives to long-term catheterization.

The final post in this series will highlight the story of one such patient who stopped using a catheter after several challenge-fraught years, and gained back his ability to urinate when he wanted to – without components or supplies, without infections and (most importantly for him) without any significant compromises to his everyday life.

Read part 3 of this series here.

 

Dr. Richard Roach attended the University of Wisconsin-Madison Medical School and completed his residency at the University of Wisconsin-Madison Hospital and Clinics. After graduation, Dr. Roach moved to Minocqua, Wisconsin and joined the Marshfield Clinic, where he practiced for the next 26 years. In 2013, he moved to Florida and is currently a partner in Advanced Urology Institute. He is certified by the American Board of Urology. His specialties include plasma vaporization for BPH, treatment of female stress incontinence and penile prosthesis for ED. He is also an expert in laser & laparoscopic surgery.

Dr. Richard Roach attended the University of Wisconsin-Madison Medical School and completed his residency at the University of Wisconsin-Madison Hospital and Clinics. After graduation, Dr. Roach moved to Minocqua, Wisconsin and joined the Marshfield Clinic, where he practiced for the next 26 years. In 2013, he moved to Florida and is currently a partner in Advanced Urology Institute. He is certified by the American Board of Urology. His specialties include plasma vaporization for BPH, treatment of female stress incontinence and penile prosthesis for ED. He is also an expert in laser & laparoscopic surgery.