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GET ACTIVE

Encourage others to start talking and gain control of their bladder health!  We've made it simple for you to share National Bladder Health Week news, resources, tips and tools with your friends, family and healthcare providers.  We have a variety of  simple activities you can choose from to promote awareness of bladder health.  They are cut and paste one of the sample newsletter or emails below.

1415 Stuart Engals Blvd
Mt Pleasant, SC, 29464
United States

843 419-5307

NAFC is a non-profit offering resources for people struggling with incontinence, adult bedwetting, OAB, SUI, nocturia, neurogenic bladder, and pelvic floor disorders like prolapse. 

INCONTINENCE STORIES FROM EXPERTS AND REAL PEOPLE | BHEALTH

Log in to the BHealth blog to hear expert advice, real stories from people suffering from incontinence issues, tips on managing adult bedwetting, how to care for a loved one, and how to maintain a healthy pelvic floor.

 

Tools to keep around if you care for someone with incontinence

Steve Gregg

If you are a new caregiver to a patient with incontinence or your family member just recently developed bladder and bowel problems, you’ll want to consider keeping supplies at the ready to help you address this condition.

In many cases, your family member or patient won’t be entirely comfortable with their situation and may attempt to thwart help or assistance. If that engagement leads to leaks or uncomfortable situations, it’s your job to be prepared and help them clean up in a dignified way.

We recommend having the following supplies ready or knowing where to get them easily:

  1. Rug pads: Individuals with nocturia or overactive bladder are very susceptible to falling from incontinence in an effort to get to the restroom quickly. Make sure the rugs in the house and bathroom are padded underneath to avoid slippage.
     

  2. Absorbent products: Many times, leakage or bladder spasms occur when the individual is in transfer, or is moving from place to place. Be at the ready to respond to these needs with an appropriate product.
     

  3. Water: Dehydration can be a catalyst for frequent urination and in some cases, urinary tract infections. Avoid your patient or family member experiencing either by encouraging and modeling enough water intake. Click here for guides on how to drink more water.
     

  4. Bladder or Bowel Diary: Managing physical and dietary responses to bladder and bowel concerns is a proven way to help manage incontinence. Help your loved one or patient track their urination, bowel movements, and intake of food and water by keeping the diaries available and ready for updates. Download the diaries here.

We hope these tips can help you be the best assistant in their journey. Are there any tools you’ve already found helpful to have?