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Encourage others to start talking and gain control of their bladder health!  We've made it simple for you to share National Bladder Health Week news, resources, tips and tools with your friends, family and healthcare providers.  We have a variety of  simple activities you can choose from to promote awareness of bladder health.  They are cut and paste one of the sample newsletter or emails below.

1415 Stuart Engals Blvd
Mt Pleasant, SC, 29464
United States

843 419-5307

NAFC is a non-profit offering resources for people struggling with incontinence, adult bedwetting, OAB, SUI, nocturia, neurogenic bladder, and pelvic floor disorders like prolapse. 

INCONTINENCE STORIES FROM EXPERTS AND REAL PEOPLE | BHEALTH

Check out the BHealth blog to hear expert advice, real stories from people suffering from incontinence issues, tips on managing adult bedwetting, how to care for a loved one, and how to maintain a healthy pelvic floor.

 

Misconceptions About Being A Mom And Bladder Health.

Sarah Jenkins

Becoming a mother is one of the most joyful things that can happen to a woman.  But it can also be challenging.  Not only are you dealing with the demanding task of raising a little one, your own body is undergoing constant change as well.  There are a lot of misconceptions out there about how our bodies should perform after we have kids - many of them false.  Take a read below and learn some of the most common misconceptions around bladder health and becoming a mother.  

Fact or Myth?  After having kids, it’s normal to pee a little when I laugh, sneeze, run, etc.

Myth. While this can happen for a few months after childbirth, it is not something that is “normal.” It should be dealt with.  Talk to your doctor or a trained physical therapist about some exercises that may help get you back to normal, and product suggestions that can help you manage incontinence in the meantime.

Fact or Myth?  If you’ve had kids, you can expect to have urinary incontinence or OAB when you become older.

Myth.  It’s true that sometimes incontinence does not rear it’s ugly head until well after you’ve had your children – often in your 40’s or 50’s.  But that doesn’t mean that it’s a sure thing you will suffer from incontinence – especially if you are proactive in getting your pelvic floor strong now.  It’s never too late to start incorporating your pelvic floor into your workout routine.

Fact or Myth?  I might as well get used to being incontinent – now that I’ve had a baby there is nothing I can really do about it anyway.

Myth.  As we mentioned above, incontinence is certainly not normal, and there are a host of things that you can do to manage, and even fix it for good.  For starters, absorbent products can help you manage immediate leaks that you may be suffering from post childbirth until you are able to build up your strength again.   When you schedule your 6-week postpartum check up with your doctor, schedule a visit with your physical therapist as well – it’s a great time for an initial evaluation and you can learn some good postpartum exercises to start right away.  And if you are still feeling like things are not quite right after a couple of months, talk with your doctor about what you can do.

Fact or Myth:  I don’t have to worry about working on my pelvic floor until after I’ve had the baby.

Myth.  One of the best things you can do to prepare yourself for childbirth is to start working out your pelvic floor today.  Not only will it make your delivery easier, but you will be that much stronger and your recovery in the postpartum days ahead will be much faster. Here are some great pelvic floor workouts for pregnant women.