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GET ACTIVE

Encourage others to start talking and gain control of their bladder health!  We've made it simple for you to share National Bladder Health Week news, resources, tips and tools with your friends, family and healthcare providers.  We have a variety of  simple activities you can choose from to promote awareness of bladder health.  They are cut and paste one of the sample newsletter or emails below.

1415 Stuart Engals Blvd
Mt Pleasant, SC, 29464
United States

843 419-5307

NAFC is a non-profit offering resources for people struggling with incontinence, adult bedwetting, OAB, SUI, nocturia, neurogenic bladder, and pelvic floor disorders like prolapse. 

INCONTINENCE STORIES FROM EXPERTS AND REAL PEOPLE | BHEALTH

Check out the BHealth blog to hear expert advice, real stories from people suffering from incontinence issues, tips on managing adult bedwetting, how to care for a loved one, and how to maintain a healthy pelvic floor.

 

Integrate Kegels Into Your Daily Workout Warmup

Sarah Jenkins

Going from zero to 60mph is great for your new two-seater racing car, but not for your muscles. It’s important to slowly gain speed in your workout routine, making your warm up routine a prime time to work your pelvic floor.

Strengthening your pelvic floor will help restore muscle function and lessen the symptoms of incontinence. Kegels are the primary pelvic floor exercise.

Whether you’re jogging, running, hiking, biking, or playing a contact sport, warming up is crucial to your exercise plan, so why not incorporate kegel training into your daily routine to help strengthen your pelvic floor muscles?

Here are a few suggestions for including kegels in your warm up routine:

·      Walk for 3-5 minutes at a steady pace. Take a break at a corner on your block or a turn on a trail and do 10 pelvic floor holds.

·      Do 10 lunges and 10 wall-sits for three reps. Between rotations, practice 5 kegels.

·      Practice a forward fold to stretch your hamstrings and back. Hold the fold 10-15 seconds, then stand and hold a kegel for 5-10 seconds. Repeat for 2-3 times.

·      Do jumping jacks or jump rope for 30-second intervals. Between each interval, practice 10 kegels.

Both men and women have pelvic floor muscles and both men and women experience a lack in pelvic floor strength as they age. Learn more about the importance of working your pelvic floor here. And find instructions on how to properly kegel, or lift your pelvic floor, here.  It is important to remember to let your muscles relax between contractions and to work all the muscles of your core to ensure optimal pelvic floor strength.  If you are unsure of the exercises that would work best for you, finding a physical therapist specialized in pelvic floor strengthening can be very helpful in creating a routine.

If you are looking for more ways to warm up before your work outs, we suggest heading over to workoutlabs.com. You can make your own printable full-body warm up graphic so you always have examples at hand. Print your own sheet out and add kegels wherever you feel most comfortable.

See our favorite full body warm up rotation below. Click here to make your own