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Encourage others to start talking and gain control of their bladder health!  We've made it simple for you to share National Bladder Health Week news, resources, tips and tools with your friends, family and healthcare providers.  We have a variety of  simple activities you can choose from to promote awareness of bladder health.  They are cut and paste one of the sample newsletter or emails below.

1415 Stuart Engals Blvd
Mt Pleasant, SC, 29464
United States

843 419-5307

NAFC is a non-profit offering resources for people struggling with incontinence, adult bedwetting, OAB, SUI, nocturia, neurogenic bladder, and pelvic floor disorders like prolapse. 

INCONTINENCE STORIES FROM EXPERTS AND REAL PEOPLE | BHEALTH

Log in to the BHealth blog to hear expert advice, real stories from people suffering from incontinence issues, tips on managing adult bedwetting, how to care for a loved one, and how to maintain a healthy pelvic floor.

 

How a 'Birth Plan' Can Help Protect Your Pelvic Floor

Dawn Dingman

The relationship between urinary incontinence (UI), pelvic floor disorders, and vaginal birth is a hot topic. Popular magazines and some scientific journals claim that vaginal birth is a cause of urinary incontinence, which has fueled the debate about another equally hot topic: cesarean delivery by maternal request! The presumed logic is this: if vaginal birth leads to UI, then cesarean delivery should be done to prevent it. In fact, questions surrounding causes and prevention of UI, as it relates to vaginal birth, are far more complex. Scientific studies done to date have shown no conclusive evidence that vaginal birth causes UI or pelvic floor disorders. Until we have more answers, cesarean deliveries done to protect the pelvic floor are unwarranted.

What is a “Birth Plan”?

It is never too early to learn what you can do during childbearing years to protect your pelvic floor and bladder health. A Birth Plan is a paper document you develop that serves as a communication tool between you and your healthcare provider. It describes how you would like to be cared for during your pregnancy, labor, and birth.  A Birth Plan helps you and your provider focus on practices and procedures you believe are important to include or avoid. Everyone wants a healthy mother and baby – that is a given. However, there are many pathways to achieving a safe, normal vaginal birth, a healthy infant and a healthy, satisfied mother and family. A Birth Plan simply places these thoughts in writing. During the course of your prenatal visits, a Birth Plan encourages conversation with your provider about the processes and procedures that occur in the hospital during labor and birth that may affect your bladder and pelvic floor.

Tips For Determining a Birth Plan

During your pregnancy, ask your provider to teach you the correct method for doing Kegel exercises. When done correctly, Kegels help strengthen your pelvic floor during pregnancy and after birth.

The obesity epidemic in the United States has led to changes in recommendations about weight gain in pregnancy. Ask your provider about the optimal weight gain for you. The old adage, “eating for two” no longer applies. Obese mothers who give birth to excessively large infants are more likely to experience postpartum bladder troubles whether having a vaginal or operative birth.

Pregnancy provides the ideal time for women to quit smoking. Cigarette smoking is a risk factor for urinary incontinence. Your healthcare provider has many suggestions to help you quit once and for all.

Once in labor, being upright allows gravity to assist with your baby’s descent instead of working against it while lying on your back.

New evidence shows that “gentle pushing” or delayed, non-directed pushing techniques can minimize pelvic trauma and are more protective than “forced pushing.”

To protect pelvic floor muscles, nerves, and connective tissue, express your desire to avoid the use of episiotomy, forceps and/or vacuum extraction. There is more than a decade of research that an episiotomy need not be performed unless there are indications for such intervention (e.g., fetal distress). Episiotomy, especially midline, has been shown to increase a woman’s risk of anal sphincter injury and not to reduce the risk of other pelvic floor disorders. Patients should discuss whether or not to have an episiotomy and be certain that their doctor will not use one, other than in extreme situations. Sometimes however, these maneuvers may be necessary for you or your baby’s health.

For help in writing a Birth Plan that works for you, consult your library, pregnancy resources, your healthcare  provider, and the Internet. Your healthcare provider can guide you about trusted web sites.

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